Hexbyte Glen Cove Two dead whales wash up on Bangladesh beach thumbnail

Hexbyte Glen Cove Two dead whales wash up on Bangladesh beach

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Officials said the whales could have died after consuming sea pollutants

Two dead whales have washed up on the same stretch of Bangladesh coastline in two days, officials said Saturday, raising suggestions that they were killed by sea pollution.

Officials said the second, much longer whale washed up on Himchhari Beach, outside the resort city of Cox’s Bazar, at around 8:30 am (0230 GMT) Saturday, just a day after the of another Bryde’s whale was found two kilometres (1.25 miles) from the spot.

“The carcass of the whale found today is at least 50 feet (16 metres) long and 10 feet wide. It weighs three-four tonnes,” Jahirul Islam, executive director of the Cox’s Bazar-based Marine Life Alliance, told AFP.

Islam said the whales could have been killed in a collision with a ship plying the Bay of Bengal, or have died after eating plastics which litter the sea.

“Primarily we think the two have died from consuming plastic and polluted objects. There is an injury mark on the back of the second whale. We suspect it could have been hit by a high-speed vessel,” Islam said.

Mohammad Shahidul Alam, a professor at the Institute of Marine Science and Fisheries, said parts of the Bay of Bengal are seriously polluted, and that could have led to the animals’ demise.

A spokesman for Bangladesh’s environment and forestry department said its researchers had collected samples from the carcasses for post mortem examinations.

Two similar also washed up on Cox’s Bazar beaches in 1996 and 2006.



© 2021 AFP

Citation:
Two dead whales wash up on Bangladesh beach (2021, April 10)
retrieved 10 April 2021
from https://phys.org/news/2021-04-dead-whales-bangladesh-beach.html

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part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for

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Hexbyte Glen Cove Stranded whales refloated in New Zealand but concerns remain thumbnail

Hexbyte Glen Cove Stranded whales refloated in New Zealand but concerns remain

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Map of New Zealand locating Farewell Spit where dozens of pilot whales were found beached early Monday.

Rescuers successfully refloated 28 pilot whales stranded on a notorious stretch of New Zealand’s coast Tuesday, but the mammals remained close to shore and could beach themselves again, wildlife officials said.

The Department of Conservation (DOC) said the long-finned were part of a pod of around 50 found Monday at Farewell Spit, about 90 kilometres (55 miles) north of the South Island tourist town of Nelson.

Around 40 were pushed out to sea on Monday evening but swam back ashore by the next morning, with around 60 volunteers helping move the 28 survivors back into the water.

“The have been close to shore and it’s uncertain whether they will swim off or possibly re-strand,” a DOC spokeswoman said.

“DOC rangers and volunteers remain on-site ready to respond if the whales start swimming for shore and become stranded again.”

At least 15 of the original pod have died.

Farewell Spit is a 26-kilometre hook of sand that protrudes into the sea at Golden Bay.

It has been the scene of at least 10 pilot whale strandings in the past 15 years.

The most recent was in February 2017, when almost 700 of the mammals beached, resulting in 250 deaths.

Scientists are unclear about why the beach is so deadly. One is that the spit creates a shallow seabed in the bay that interferes with the whales’ sonar navigation systems.



© 2021 AFP

Citation:
Stranded whales refloated in New Zealand but concerns remain (2021, February 23)
retrieved 24 February 2021
from https://phys.org/news/2021-02-stranded-whales-refloated-zealand.html

This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no
part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.

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