Hexbyte Glen Cove Russian rocket launches UK telecom satellites after delay thumbnail

Hexbyte Glen Cove Russian rocket launches UK telecom satellites after delay

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A Russian Soyuz rocket carrying 36 UK telecommunication and internet satellites blasted off from the Vostochny cosmodrome in Russia’s Far East on Friday, the space agency said.

During the , which was carried out by Arianespace, the world’s leading satellite launch company, the Soyuz rocket took off at 1738 GMT.

“The launch went according to plan,” Dmitry Rogozin, the head of the Roscosmos , said on messaging app Telegram.

The launch was originally scheduled for Thursday but was postponed for technical reasons.

OneWeb, a London-headquartered company, is working to complete the construction of a constellation of low earth orbit satellites providing enhanced broadband and other services to countries around the world.

The company is competing against billionaires Elon Musk and Jeff Bezos in the race to provide fast internet via satellites for the world’s .

The UK company plans for its global commercial internet service to be operational by next year, supported by some 650 satellites.

Earlier launches of 36 satellites each took place in April and March.

“The satellites arrive pre-assembled from Florida in containers. Our team takes them over in Russia and accompanies them from their arrival at the airport until the launch,” Arianespace launch campaign manager, Jean-Claude Garreau, told AFP.

The satellites are then launched in clusters of 36 and they separate into groups of four when in orbit, he added.

Arianespace, which has worked with Russia for close to two decades, is contracted to make 16 Soyuz launches between December 2020 and the end of 2022.

The Vostochny launch site is one of Russia’s most important space projects, designed to reduce reliance on the Baikonur cosmodrome Moscow currently rents from Kazakhstan.

The project has been consistently behind schedule, with its construction marred for years by multiple controversies including corruption.



© 2021 AFP

Citation:
Russian rocket launches UK telecom satellites after delay (2021, May 28)
retrieved 29 May 202

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Hexbyte Glen Cove Rocket Lab's satellite launch from New Zealand site fails thumbnail

Hexbyte Glen Cove Rocket Lab’s satellite launch from New Zealand site fails

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California-based Rocket Lab said a launch of satellites from its facility in New Zealand failed Saturday.

The problem occurred during ignition of the Electron rocket’s second stage, the said in a statement.

The rocket was carrying two Earth-observation satellites for BlackSky, a global monitoring company.

“Today’s anomaly occurred after 17 successful orbital launches of the Electron launch vehicle. With multiple launch vehicles currently in production, Rocket Lab is prepared for a rapid return to as soon as investigations are complete and any required corrective actions are in place,” the statement said.

Rocket Lab said the ‘s first stage successfully parachuted into the ocean and crews were working to recover it. The company is trying to develop a capability to recover and reuse Electron first stages.



© 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

Citation:
Rocket Lab’s satellite launch from New Zealand site fails (2021, May 16)
retrieved 17 May 2021
from https://phys.org/news/2021-05-rocket-lab-satellite-zealand-site.html

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Hexbyte Glen Cove Chinese rocket to tumble back to Earth in uncontrolled re-entry thumbnail

Hexbyte Glen Cove Chinese rocket to tumble back to Earth in uncontrolled re-entry

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A large segment of China’s Long March-5B rocket, pictured here during launch on April 29, is expected to make an uncontrolled reentry into the Earth’s atmosphere

A large segment of a Chinese rocket is expected to make an uncontrolled re-entry into the Earth’s atmosphere over the weekend, but Beijing has downplayed fears of damage on the ground and said the risk is very low.

A Long March-5B rocket launched the first module of China’s new space station into Earth’s orbit on April 29.

Its 18-tonne main segment is now in freefall and experts have said it is difficult to say precisely where and when it will re-enter the atmosphere.

Russian space agency Roscosmos predicted the rocket will re-enter after 2330 GMT Saturday south of Indonesia over the Timor Sea.

The Pentagon gave a time of around 2300 GMT Saturday with a window of nine hours either side.

Chinese authorities have said most of the rocket components will likely be destroyed as it descends.

“The probability of causing harm… on the ground is extremely low,” Chinese foreign ministry spokesman Wang Wenbin told reporters on Friday.

Although there has been fevered speculation over exactly where the rocket—or parts of it—will land, there is a good chance any debris that does not burn up will just splash down into the ocean, given that the planet is 70 percent water.

“We’re hopeful that it will land in a place where it won’t harm anyone,” said Pentagon spokesman Mike Howard.

Possible trajectories of the main stage of the Chinese rocket that is expected to make an uncontrolled re-entry into the Earth’s atmosphere

Howard said the United States was tracking the rocket segment but “its exact entry point into the Earth’s atmosphere cannot be pinpointed until within hours of its re-entry”.

Defence Secretary Lloyd Austin earlier said the US military had no plans to shoot it down, and suggested that China had been negligent in letting it fall out of orbit.

“Given the size of the object, there will necessarily be big pieces left over,” said Florent Delefie, an astronomer at the Paris-PSL Observatory.

“The chances of debris landing on an inhabited zone are tiny, probably one in a million.”

Last year debris from another Long March rocket fell on villages in the Ivory Coast, causing structural damage but no injuries or deaths.

Jonathan McDowell, an astrophysicist at the Harvard–Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, said that although there was no need to worry “too much”, the rocket’s design needed a re-think to stop such a scenario happening again.

“There is a real chance of damage to whatever it hits and the outside chance of a casualty,” he said.

“Having a ton of metal shards flying into the Earth at hundreds of kilometres per hour is not good practice, and China should redesign the Long-March 5B missions to avoid this.”



© 2021 AFP

Citation:
Chinese rocket to tumble back to Earth in uncontrolled re-entry (2021, May 8)
retrieved 9 May 2021
from https://phys.org/news/2021-05-chinese-rocket-earth-uncontrolled-re-entry.html

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part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.

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Hexbyte Glen Cove Sounding rocket CLASP2 elucidates solar magnetic field thumbnail

Hexbyte Glen Cove Sounding rocket CLASP2 elucidates solar magnetic field

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Measuring the magnetic field strength at four different heights (horizontal planes) by using data from the CLASP2 and Hinode space telescopes allowed astronomers to map the spreading of magnetic field lines (shown in green) in the chromosphere. Credit: NAOJ

Cooperative operations between a solar observation satellite and a sounding-rocket telescope have measured the magnetic field strength in the photosphere and chromosphere above an active solar plage region. This is the first time that the magnetic field in the chromosphere has been charted all the way up its top. This finding brings us closer to understanding how energy is transferred between layers of the Sun.

Despite being the brightest object in the sky, the Sun still holds many mysteries for astronomers. It is generally believed that magnetic fields play an important role in heating the , but the details of the process are still unclear. To solve this mystery it is important to understand the magnetic field in the chromosphere, which is sandwiched between the corona and the photosphere, the visible surface of the Sun.

An international team led by Ryohko Ishikawa, an assistant professor at the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, and Javier Trujillo Bueno, a professor at the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, analyzed data collected by the CLASP2 sounding rocket experiment over six-and-a-half-minutes on April 11, 2019. They determined the longitudinal component of the magnetic field above an active region plage and its surroundings by analyzing the signature that the magnetic field imprinted on ultraviolet light from the chromosphere.

The unique high precision data from CLASP2 allowed the team to determine the magnetic field strengths in the lower, mid, and upper regions of the chromosphere. Simultaneously acquired data from the Japanese solar observation satellite Hinode provided information about the magnetic field in the plage itself in the photosphere. The team found that the plage is highly structured in the but expands, rapidly merging and spreading horizontally, in the . This new picture brings us closer to understanding how magnetic fields transfer energy to the corona from the lower layers of the Sun.

The animation shows the CLASP2 launch, CLASP2/SJ movie, CLASP2 and Hinode data used in the study, the main result, and recovery of the CLASP2 instrument. Credit: NAOJ, NASA, IAC, IAS

The study is published in Science Advances.

  • CLASP2 launch. Credit: US Army Photo, White Sands Missile Range
  • CLASP2 and Hinode data used in the study. The background is the image taken by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) satellite. Credit: NAOJ, NASA, IAC, IAS
  • Longitudinal component of the magnetic field (in gauss) at each point along the spatial direction indicated by the green line in the left panels of figure 1. The strongest and weakest magnetic fields are found in the photosphere (green curve), where there are strongly magnetized regions (up to 1250 gauss) separated by others that are weakly magnetized (10 gauss). This substantial variation in the magnetic field intensity when moving horizontally in the photosphere decreases at heights corresponding to the lower chromosphere (blue symbols) and is even smaller in the intermediate (black symbols) and outer (red symbols) layers of the chromosphere. These results confirm and prove that, in such active regions of the solar atmosphere, the lines of force of the magnetic field expand and fill the whole chromosphere before reaching the base of the corona. Credit: NAOJ, IAC, NASA/MSFC, IAS.


More information:
R. Ishikawa el al., “Mapping solar magnetic fields from the photosphere to the base of the corona,” Science Advances (2021). advances.sciencemag.org/lookup … .1126/sciadv.abe8406

Citation:
Sounding rocket CLASP2 elucidates solar magnetic field (2021, February 19)
retrieved 20 February 2021
from https://phys.org/news/2021-02-rocket-clasp2-elucidates-solar-magnetic.html

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part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.

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