Hexbyte Glen Cove Indonesian women take on plastic waste brick by brick thumbnail

Hexbyte Glen Cove Indonesian women take on plastic waste brick by brick

Hexbyte Glen Cove

Novita Tan launched recycling company Rebrick after Indonesia drew headlines as the second-biggest producer of marine waste in the world behind China.

Alarmed by the mountains of plastic waste leaching into Indonesia’s waters, two best friends are taking on the environmental menace by turning crisp bags and shampoo packets into paving bricks.

Ovy Sabrina and Novita Tan launched Rebricks after their country drew headlines as the second-biggest producer of marine waste in the world, behind China.

Indonesia has pledged to reduce by some 75 percent over the next four years—a mammoth task in the Southeast Asian nation of nearly 270 million people.

The pair got their start two years ago visiting food stalls across the capital Jakarta on the hunt for discarded instant coffee sachets, dried noodle packs and shopping bags.

Thanks to a viral social media campaign, the pair now receive reams of plastic waste packaging from donors across the country.

That rubbish flows in daily and is piled high at the little firm’s Jakarta-area factory.

“It shows how Indonesians have a strong awareness of recycling plastic waste, but they don’t know where to do it,” 34-year-old Sabrina said.

Rebricks staff mulch the packaging into tiny flakes that are then mixed with cement and sand and moulded into .

They make look like conventional bricks, but break one open and it is dotted with flecks of plastic.

Rebricks now receives plastic waste packaging from donors across the country.

Tonnes of trash

The two entrepreneurs say their method diverts waste that would have otherwise ended up in a landfill or the ocean—about four tons so far and counting.

“Every day, we can stop about 88,000 pieces of plastic sachets from littering the environment,” Tan said, adding that the company has produced more than 100,000 bricks.

Some Indonesian cities have banned single-use plastics, but waste recycling is still rare.

The problem was underscored in 2018 by the discovery of a dead sperm whale that washed ashore in a with nearly six kilograms (13 pounds) of plastic waste in its stomach.

The Rebricks pair spent two years trying to perfect their method, and picked up hints from a building materials business run by Sabrina’s family.

Some Indonesian entrepreneurs are molding plastic into flower vases, umbrellas or purses.

But the two women decided to focus on bricks so they could reach more customers.

“If our approach was to sell expensive decorative goods, there would only be a few people buying our products,” Sabrina said.

The two women hope to expand their company, which employs four people, and said they were in talks with a big consumer-goods firm about a possible collaboration.

Customer Andi Subagio said he had used the eco-bricks for repaving a restaurant walkway.

“They’re not as fragile as conventional bricks because of the inside,” he said. “And it’s about the same price.”



© 2021 AFP

Citation:
Indonesian women take on plastic waste brick by brick (2021, June 5)
retrieved 6 June 2021
from https://phys.org/news/2021-06-indonesian-women-plastic-brick.html

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part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.

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Hexbyte Glen Cove Ape escape: Indonesian orangutans airlifted back to the wild thumbnail

Hexbyte Glen Cove Ape escape: Indonesian orangutans airlifted back to the wild

Hexbyte Glen Cove

An orangutan in a cage is delivered by helicopter in Central Kalimantan, Borneo, Indonesia

Ten orangutans have been airlifted back to their natural habitat on Indonesia’s Borneo island, in the first release of the apes into the wild for a year due to the dangers of coronavirus infection.

The animals were flown by helicopter across the island’s dense jungle earlier this month to keep them away from days-long land and sea routes that could expose them to the virus.

Orangutans share 97 percent of humans’ DNA so conservationists have been on high alert for signs of infection. The pandemic has thrown up unprecedented challenges for .

“For an entire year, we have not been able to release orangutans due to the global pandemic,” said Jamartin Sihite, chief executive of the Borneo Orangutan Survival Foundation (BOSF).

“We have implemented strict health protocols, and introduced mitigation plans to be enacted in the event of an orangutan contracting the virus. The use of a helicopter… helps reduce the risk of spreading Covid-19.”

The fuzzy-haired creatures were sedated with tranquillisers before their flight and were shuttled inside transport cages encased in netting.

At least one of the moon-faced animals banged on its cage’s metal walls as it tried to make sense of the airborne mission.

The apes took a short boat trip after touching down, before arriving at the Bukit Batikap Protection Forest in Central Kalimantan—part of Indonesia’s section of Borneo—where they took to swinging on vines.

Several apes were also released into another forest in East Kalimantan.

Poaching and decimated the Southeast Asian nation’s orangutan population before the coronavirus emerged as another to the critically .

“If an orangutan shows symptoms of respiratory problems, it’s possible that it has been infected with Covid-19,” said Vivi Dwi Santi, a veterinarian with BOSF.

“Also, if one of the staff tests positive… we will conduct tracing on an orangutan that’s been in contact with them.”



© 2021 AFP

Citation:
Ape escape: Indonesian orangutans airlifted back to the wild (2021, February 23)
retrieved 24 February 2021
from https://phys.org/news/2021-02-ape-indonesian-orangutans-airlifted-wild.html

This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no
part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.

Read More Hexbyte Glen Cove Educational Blog Repost With Backlinks —