Hexbyte Glen Cove Image: Mediterranean continues to bake thumbnail

Hexbyte Glen Cove Image: Mediterranean continues to bake

Hexbyte Glen Cove

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Credit: contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data (2021), processed by ESA, CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO

This map shows the temperature of the land surface on 2 August 2021. It is clear to see that surface temperatures in Turkey and Cyprus have reached over 50°C, again. A map we published on 2 July shows pretty much the same situation. The Mediterranean has been suffering a heatwave for some weeks, leading to numerous wildfires. Turkey, for example, is reported to be amid the country’s worst blazes in at least a decade.

The map here was generated using data from Copernicus Sentinel-3’s Sea and Land Surface Temperature Radiometer. While use predicted air temperatures, this measures the real amount of energy radiating from Earth—and dipicts the real temperature of the land surface.

The Copernicus Sentinel-3 satellites also carry camera-like instruments, which captured smoke billowing from the fires in Turkey on 30 July.



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Image: Mediterranean continues to bake (2021, August 4)
retrieved 4 August 2021
from https://phys.org/news/2021-08-image-mediterranean.html

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Hexbyte Glen Cove Image: Hubble spots squabbling galactic siblings thumbnail

Hexbyte Glen Cove Image: Hubble spots squabbling galactic siblings

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Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, J. Dalcanton

A dramatic triplet of galaxies takes center stage in this image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, which captures a three-way gravitational tug-of-war between interacting galaxies. This system—known as Arp 195—is featured in the Atlas of Peculiar Galaxies, a list which showcases some of the weirder and more wonderful galaxies in the universe.

Observing time with Hubble is extremely valuable, so astronomers don’t want to waste a second. The schedule for Hubble observations is calculated using a which allows the spacecraft to occasionally gather bonus snapshots of data between longer observations.

This image of the clashing triplet of in Arp 195 is one such snapshot.

Extra observations such as these do more than provide spectacular images—they also help to identify promising targets to follow up with using telescopes such as the upcoming NASA/ESA/CSA James Webb Space Telescope.



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Image: Hubble spots squabbling galactic siblings (2021, July 31)
retrieved 31 July 2021
from https://phys.org/news/2021-07-image-hubble-squabbling-galactic-siblings.html

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Hexbyte Glen Cove Image: Hubble views a faraway galaxy through a cosmic lens thumbnail

Hexbyte Glen Cove Image: Hubble views a faraway galaxy through a cosmic lens

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Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, A. Newman, M. Akhshik, K. Whitaker

The center of this image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope is framed by the tell-tale arcs that result from strong gravitational lensing, a striking astronomical phenomenon which can warp, magnify, or even duplicate the appearance of distant galaxies.

Gravitational lensing occurs when light from a distant galaxy is subtly distorted by the of an intervening . In this case, the relatively nearby galaxy cluster MACSJ0138.0-2155 has lensed a significantly more distant inactive galaxy—a slumbering giant known as MRG-M0138 which has run out of the gas required to form new stars and is located 10 billion light-years away. Astronomers can use as a natural magnifying glass, allowing them to inspect objects like distant dormant galaxies which would usually be too difficult for even Hubble to resolve.

This image was made using observations from eight different infrared filters spread across two of Hubble’s most advanced astronomical instruments: the Advanced Camera for Surveys and the Wide Field Camera 3. These instruments were installed by astronauts during the final two servicing missions to Hubble and provide astronomers with superbly detailed observations across a large area of sky and a wide range of wavelengths.



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Image: Hubble views a faraway galaxy through a cosmic lens (2021, July 24)
retrieved 24 July 2021
from https://phys.org/news/2021-07-image-hubble-views-faraway-galaxy.html

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Hexbyte Glen Cove Image: Hubble revisits the Veil Nebula thumbnail

Hexbyte Glen Cove Image: Hubble revisits the Veil Nebula

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Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, Z. Levay

This image taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope revisits the Veil Nebula, which was featured in a previous Hubble image release. In this image, new processing techniques have been applied, bringing out fine details of the nebula’s delicate threads and filaments of ionized gas.

To create this colorful image, observations were taken by Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3 instrument using five different filters. The new post-processing methods have further enhanced details of emissions from doubly ionized oxygen (seen here in blues), ionized hydrogen, and ionized nitrogen (seen here in reds).

The Veil Nebula lies around 2,100 light-years from Earth in the constellation of Cygnus (the Swan), making it a relatively close neighbor in astronomical terms. Only a small portion of the was captured in this image.

The Veil Nebula is the visible portion of the nearby Cygnus Loop, a supernova remnant formed roughly 10,000 years ago by the death of a massive star. That star—which was 20 times the mass of the Sun—lived fast and died young, ending its life in a cataclysmic release of energy. Despite this stellar violence, the shockwaves and debris from the supernova sculpted the Veil Nebula’s delicate tracery of ionized gas—creating a scene of surprising astronomical beauty.

The Veil Nebula is also featured in Hubble’s Caldwell Catalog, a collection of astronomical objects that have been imaged by Hubble and are visible to amateur astronomers in the night sky.



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Image: Hubble revisits the Veil Nebula (2021, April 2)
retrieved 3 April 2021
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Hexbyte Glen Cove Image: Hubble takes portrait of nebula thumbnail

Hexbyte Glen Cove Image: Hubble takes portrait of nebula

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Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, L. Stanghellini

This image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope features an impressive portrait of M1-63, a beautifully captured example of a bipolar planetary nebula located in the constellation of Scutum (the Shield).

A nebula like this one is formed when the star at its center sheds huge quantities of material from its outer layers, leaving behind a spectacular cloud of gas and dust. 

It is believed that a binary system of at the center of the bipolar is capable of creating hourglass or butterfly-like shapes like the one in this image.

This is because the material from the shedding star is funneled toward its poles, with the help of the companion, creating the distinctive double-lobed structure seen in nebulae such as M1-63.



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Image: Hubble takes portrait of nebula (2021, February 13)
retrieved 13 February 2021
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