Australia aims to host 2026 UN climate summit

Hexbyte Glen Cove

Centre-left Albanese was swept to power this year on a wave of popular anger about the pro-fossil fuel stance of Australia’s decade-old conservative government.

Australia hopes to host the 2026 COP summit, Prime Minister Anthony Albanese said Saturday, seeking to overhaul his country’s reputation for foot-dragging on climate change.

“It is a good opportunity, I believe, for Australia to show and to what is a major global event,” Albanese said during a visit to Bangkok.

Centre-left Albanese was swept to power this year on a wave of popular anger about the pro-fossil fuel stance of Australia’s decade-old conservative government.

He has since introduced a 2050 net zero emissions target—not ambitious by world standards, but a near-revolution for Australia, one of the world’s largest gas and coal producers.

He has also vowed to co-host a COP summit with Pacific Island allies—who are under serious threat from rising sea levels and who have long criticised Australia’s scepticism.

Albanese may have hoped to host the event before he faces reelection in 2025, but diplomatic horse-trading means 2026 is now more likely.

The United Arab Emirates is slated to host the talks in 2023, a European country is hoping for the 2024 event and Brazil is bidding for the 2025 talks, leaving 2026 as the most likely option for Australia.

“I’ve had a very positive response from all of the nations that I have raised it with,” Albanese said.

If the summit materialises, it would be symbolic of a dramatic shift for Australia.

At successive COP talks, the country’s delegation has been a thorn in the side of negotiators, refusing to compromise and winning deep carve-outs that significantly weakened overall agreements.

The Climate Council’s Wesley Morgan—an expert on Australia and Pacific policy—described Australia’s COP bid as a “very big deal”.

It would, he argued, confirm Australia’s shift away from , improve sometimes fraught relations with the Pacific Islands and may force even Canberra to adopt more ambitious targets.

“Hopefully (it) means Australia will commit serious policy for deeper emissions cuts this decade,” he said.

Australia remains a large fossil fuel producer and provides thousands of jobs in key electoral districts.

But simmering public anger at devastating bushfires and two years of massive flooding have boosted domestic support for change.

Albanese has vowed to turn the sun-kissed island-continent into what he calls a “renewable energy superpower”.

© 2022 AFP

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Australia aims to host 2026 UN climate summit (2022, November 19)
retrieved 20 November 2022
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Earliest proof of cooking shows our ancestors liked well-done fish

Hexbyte Glen Cove

An illustration of hominins exploiting and cooking Luciobarbus longiceps (large barb, Cyprinidae) on the shores of paleo Lake Hula(illustration by Ella Maru). Credit: Tel Aviv University

Early human ancestors living 780,000 years ago liked their fish well-done, Israeli researchers revealed Monday, in what they said was the earliest evidence of fire being used to cook.

Exactly when our ancestors started cooking has been a matter of controversy among archaeologists because it is difficult to prove that an ancient fireplace was used to prepare food, and not just for warmth.

But the birth of the culinary arts marks an important turning point in , because by making food easier to chew and digest it is believed to have greatly contributed to our eventual expansion across the world.

Previously, the first “definitive evidence” of cooking was by Neanderthals and early Homo sapiens 170,000 years ago, according to a new study published in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution.

The study, which pushes that date back by more than 600,000 years, is the result of 16 years of work by its first author Irit Zohar, an archaeologist at Tel Aviv University’s Steinhardt Museum of Natural History.

During that time she has catalogued thousands of fish remains found at a site called Gesher Benot Ya’aqov in northern Israel.

The site near the banks of the Jordan River was once home to a lake, where a treasure trove of ancient fish fossils helped the team of researchers investigate exactly when the first cooks started getting inventive in the kitchen.

“It was like facing a puzzle, with more and more information until we could make a story about ,” Zohar told AFP.

‘Desire to cook’?

The first clue came in an area that contained “nearly no fish bones” but lots of teeth, she said.

This could point towards cooking because soften and disintegrate at temperatures under 500 degrees Celsius (930 Fahrenheit)—but their teeth remain.

In the same area, a colleague of Zohar’s found burnt flints and other evidence that it had previously been used as a fireplace.

And most of the teeth belonged to just two particularly large species of carp, suggesting they had been selected for their “succulent” meat, the study said. Some of the carp were over two meters (6.5 feet) long.

The “decisive” proof came by studying the teeth’s enamel, Zohar said.

The researchers used a technique called X-ray powder diffraction at the Natural History Museum in London to find out how heating changes the structure of the crystals which make up enamel.

Comparing the results with other fish fossils, they found that the teeth from the key area of the lake were subjected to a temperature of between 200-500 degrees Celsius (400-930 Fahrenheit).

That is just the right range for well-cooked fish.

Whether our forerunners baked, grilled, poached or sauted their fish remains unknown, though the study suggested they may have used some kind of earth oven.

Fire is thought to have first been mastered by Homo erectus some 1.7 million years ago.

But “because you can control for warming, that does not mean you control it for cooking—they could have eaten the next to the fire,” Zohar said.

Then the human ancestors might have thrown the bones in the fire, said Anais Marrast, an archaeozoologist at France’s National Museum of Natural History not involved in the study.

“The whole question about exposure to fire is whether it is about getting rid of remains or a desire to cook,” she said.

More information:
Irit Zohar et al, Evidence for the cooking of fish 780,000 years ago at Gesher Benot Ya’aqov, Israel, Nature Ecology & Evolution (2022). DOI: 10.1038/s41559-022-01910-z

© 2022 AFP

Citation:
Earliest proof of cooking shows our ancestors liked well-done fish (2022, November 19)
retrieved 19 November 2022
from https://phys.org/news/2022-11-earliest-proof-cooking-ancestors-well-done.html

This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no
part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.

% %item_read_more_button%% Hexbyte Glen Cove Educational Blog Repost With Backlinks — #metaverse #vr #ar #wordpress