Hexbyte Glen Cove 16 dead as Storm Eunice, hits power, transport in W.Europe

Hexbyte Glen Cove

At least 14 people were killed by falling trees and flying debris caused by the storm-force winds.

Emergency crews Saturday battled to restore power to more than one million homes and businesses a day after Storm Eunice carved a deadly trail across northwest Europe and left transport networks in disarray.

At least 16 people were killed by falling trees and flying debris caused by the fierce winds in Britain, Ireland, the Netherlands, Belgium, Germany and Poland, said.

Train operators in Britain urged people not to travel, after most of the network was shut down when Eunice brought the strongest wind gust ever recorded in England—122 miles (196 kilometres) per hour.

In Brentwood, east of London, a 400-year-old tree crashed into a house where Sven Good was working from home, as millions of other Britons heeded government advice to stay indoors.

“I could feel the whole roof going above me. It was absolutely terrifying,” Good, 23, told Sky News, adding that none of the occupants was injured.

The train network in the Netherlands was paralysed, with no Eurostar and Thalys international services running from Britain and France after damage to overhead power lines.

France and Ireland were also grappling with rail disruption and power cuts, and Germany’s rail operator Deutsche Bahn said “more than 1,000 kilometres” (620 miles) of track had suffered damage.

Explosive storms

Poland still had 1.2 million customers without electricity on Saturday afternoon, officials said, after the country’s northwest took a battering.

Storm Eunice brought the largest wind gust ever recorded in England—122 miles (196 kilometres) per hour.

“I appeal to you: please stay at home!” Polish Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki said in a Facebook post.

“We are constantly monitoring the situation and the appropriate services are at work. The fire brigade has already intervened more than 12,000 times,” he said.

In the UK, 226,000 homes and businesses remained without power after 1.2 million others were reconnected.

The toll so far includes four each in the Netherlands and Poland; three in the UK, two dead each in Belgium and Germany, and one in Ireland.

Around 30 people in northern France were injured in storm-related road accidents, and in the Netherlands, dozens of people have to be evacuated from their homes because of fears that a church’s clock tower might collapse.

Eunice sparked the first-ever “red” weather warning for London on Friday. It was one of the most powerful tempests in Europe since the “Great Storm” hit Britain and northern France in 1987.

Scientists said both storms packed a “sting jet”, a rarely seen meteorological phenomenon borne out of an unusual confluence of pressure systems in the Atlantic that magnified the effects of Eunice.

Hefty insurance bill

The Met Office, Britain’s meteorological service, on Saturday issued a less severe “yellow” wind warning for much of the south coast of England and South Wales, which it said “could hamper recovery efforts from Storm Eunice”.

London’s rush-hour streets were virtually deserted as many heeded government advice to stay at home.

The UK’s total bill for damage could exceed £300 million ($410 million, 360 million euros), according to the Association of British Insurers, based on repairs from previous storms.

At the storm’s height, planes struggled to land in ferocious winds, as documented by the YouTube channel Big Jet TV, which streamed the attempts to a mass live following from London’s Heathrow airport.

Hundreds of other flights were cancelled or delayed at Heathrow and Gatwick, and Schiphol in Amsterdam.

A section of the roof on London’s O2 Arena was shredded, and the spire of a church in the historic city of Wells, southwest England, toppled over.

Ferries across the Channel, the world’s busiest shipping lane, were suspended, before the English port of Dover reopened Friday afternoon.

Experts said the frequency and intensity of the storms could not be linked necessarily to .

But Richard Allan, professor of climate science at the University of Reading, said a heating planet was leading to more intense rainfall and higher sea levels.

Therefore, he said, “flooding from coastal surges and prolonged deluges will worsen still further when these rare, explosive storms hit us in a warmer world”.



© 2022 AFP

Citation:
16 dead as Storm Eunice, hits power, transport in W.Europe (2022, February 20)
retrieved 21 February 2022
from https://phys.org/news/2022-02-dead-storm-eunice-power-weurope.html

This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no
part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.

% %item_read_more_button%% Hexbyte Glen Cove Educational Blog Repost With Backlinks — #metaverse #vr #ar #wordpress

Hexbyte Glen Cove State officials: Bird flu found at 4th Indiana turkey farm

Hexbyte Glen Cove

Credit: Pixabay/CC0 Public Domain

Avian influenza has been detected in a fourth commercial poultry flock in southern Indiana, state officials said Saturday.

Laboratory testing of a second commercial flock of turkeys in Greene County has come back as presumptively positive for the , the Indiana State Board of Animal Health said. The samples are being verified at the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Veterinary Services Laboratory in Iowa.

Another possible case was found about 5 miles (8 kilometers) away in Greene County earlier in the week. Two previous cases were found in adjacent Dubois County.

Pending test results should indicate if the virus is the same as that in the previous cases and if the virus is highly pathogenic.

Officials have begun euthanizing the 15,200 birds at the latest farm to prevent the spread of the disease.

A 10-kilometer (6.2-mile) circle has been established around the latest farm in Greene County. Thirteen commercial flocks within the new control area are under quarantine and will be tested regularly, the board said.

Animal Health Board staff have reached out to known hobby/backyard poultry owners in the new control area to schedule testing of birds there, it said.

The agency said does not present an immediate public health concern and no human cases of avian influenza viruses have been detected in the U.S.

The turkey infections are the first confirmation of highly pathogenic bird flu in commercial poultry in the U.S. since 2020, the U.S. Department of Agriculture has said.

A January 2016 outbreak of bird flu in Dubois County affected 11 poultry farms, resulting in the loss of more than 400,000 , the Animal Health Board said.

Indiana ranks third nationally in turkey production.



© 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

Citation:
State officials: Bird flu found at 4th Indiana turkey farm (2022, February 20)
retrieved 21 February 2022
from https://phys.org/news/2022-02-state-bird-flu-4th-indiana.html

This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or r

% %item_read_more_button%% Hexbyte Glen Cove Educational Blog Repost With Backlinks — #metaverse #vr #ar #wordpress

Hexbyte Glen Cove US sea levels to rise at a faster pace than in past 100 years

Hexbyte Glen Cove

Credit: CC0 Public Domain

Oceans along the U.S. coastline will rise faster within the next three decades than they did in the past 100 years, bringing more flooding to coastal cities such as New York and Miami, according to the latest projections.

Sea levels are expected to rise as much as 12 inches (30 centimeters) by 2050, according to a report led by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. While the amounts vary according to region, the inundation will lead to more and make tidal and storm surge more severe, the multi-agency report said.

“Sea levels are continuing to rise at a very alarming rate,” Bill Nelson, administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, said Tuesday in a conference call with reporters. “And it’s endangering communities around the world.”

Rising waters are threatening including New York, Boston and Miami, which already commonly experience flooding during that occur with full and new moons. Homes, businesses, highways and other infrastructure along coastlines are vulnerable to damage from flooding and rising sea levels. Nearly 8 million homes, with a reconstruction cost of $1.9 trillion, are at risk of storm surges, according to a 2021 CoreLogic report.

Sea levels in Manhattan could rise by 2 feet as early as 2055 or as late as 2078, depending on the impacts of climate change, according to NOAA estimates. About 7,895 people in Manhattan live in low-lying areas that would flood with less than 2 feet of rise.

High-tide flooding has more than doubled in New York since 2000 and now occurs 10 to 15 times a year, the report said. The annual frequency of flooding in Miami and Charleston, South Carolina, has grown from zero to two days in 2000 to about five to 10 days as of last year.

“These increases will continue, further accelerate, and spread to more locations over the next couple of decades,” said the report, which updates a sea-level projection from 2017. The U.S. uses satellites to measure ice thickness and the levels oceans are rising. “This new data on sea rise is the latest reconfirmation that our climate crisis—as the President has said—is blinking ‘code red,'” White House National Climate Advisor Gina McCarthy said in a statement. “We must redouble our efforts to cut the greenhouse gasses that cause climate change while, at the same time, help our coastal communities become more resilient in the face of rising seas.”

By trapping heat that melts ice sheets, will likely contribute about 2 feet of global sea level rise by 2100, according to the report. Failing to curb future emissions could cause sea levels to rise an additional 18 inches by the end of the century to reach 5 feet. The U.S. coast from around North Carolina up to Maine is a global sea-level rise hotspot.

Global warming above 5.5 degrees Fahrenheit (3 degrees Celsius) would spur on rapid melting of Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets, releasing that water into oceans. The exact damage is difficult to model because of “ instability,” the report said.

In addition to NOAA, researchers from NASA, the Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. Geological Survey, the Department of Defense, the Army Corps of Engineers and the Federal Emergency Management Agency all contributed to the 111-page report.



©2022 Bloomberg L.P.
Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

Citation:
US sea levels to rise at a faster pace than in past 100 years (2022, February 19)
retrieved 20 February 2022

% %item_read_more_button%% Hexbyte Glen Cove Educational Blog Repost With Backlinks — #metaverse #vr #ar #wordpress

Hexbyte Glen Cove How world’s most precise clock could transform fundamental physics

Hexbyte Glen Cove

This handout photo provided by NIST shows a strontium atomic clock, one of the world’s most accurate time-keeping pieces in the lab of Professor Jun Ye at the University of Colorado, in Boulder.

Einstein’s theory of general relativity holds that a massive body like Earth curves space-time, causing time to slow as you approach the object—so a person on top of a mountain ages a tiny bit faster than someone at sea level.

US scientists have now confirmed the theory at the smallest scale ever, demonstrating that clocks tick at different rates when separated by fractions of a millimeter.

Jun Ye, of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the University of Colorado Boulder, told AFP their new clock was “by far” the most precise ever built—and could pave the way for new discoveries in quantum mechanics, the rulebook for the subatomic world.

Ye and colleagues published their findings Wednesday in the prestigious journal Nature, describing the engineering advances that enabled them to build a device 50 times more precise than today’s best atomic clocks.

It wasn’t until the invention of atomic clocks—which keep time by detecting the transition between two energy states inside an atom exposed to a particular frequency—that scientists could prove Albert Einstein’s 1915 theory.

Early experiments included the Gravity Probe A of 1976, which involved a spacecraft 6,000 miles (10,000 kilometers) above Earth’s surface and showed that an onboard clock was faster than an equivalent on Earth by one second every 73 years.

Since then, clocks have become more and more precise, and thus better able to detect the effects of relativity.

In 2010, NIST scientists observed time moving at different rates when their clock was moved 33 centimeters (just over a foot) higher.

Theory of everything

Ye’s key breakthrough was working with webs of light, known as optical lattices, to trap atoms in orderly arrangements. This is to stop the atoms from falling due to gravity or otherwise moving, resulting in a loss of accuracy.

Inside Ye’s new clock are 100,000 strontium atoms, layered on top of each other like a stack of pancakes, in total about a millimeter high.

The clock is so precise that when the scientists divided the stack into two, they could detect differences in time in the top and bottom halves.

At this level of accuracy, clocks essentially act as sensors.

“Space and time are connected,” said Ye. “And with time measurement so precise, you can actually see how space is changing in real time—Earth is a lively, living body.”

Such clocks spread out over a volcanically-active region could tell geologists the difference between solid rock and lava, helping predict eruptions.

Or, for example, study how global warming is causing glaciers to melt and oceans to rise.

What excites Ye most, however, is how future clocks could usher in a completely new realm of physics.

The current clock can detect time differences across 200 microns—but if that was brought down to 20 microns, it could start to probe the quantum world, helping bridge disparities in theory.

While relativity beautifully explains how large objects like planets and galaxies behave, it is famously incompatible with quantum mechanics, which deals with the very small.

According to quantum theory, every particle is also a wave—and can occupy multiple places at the same time, something known as superposition. But it’s not clear how an object in two places at once would distort space-time, per Einstein’s theory.

The intersection of the two fields therefore would bring physics a step closer to a unifying “theory of everything” that explains all physical phenomena of the cosmos.



More information:
Tobias Bothwell, Resolving the gravitational redshift in a millimetre-scale atomic sample, Nature (2022). DOI: 10.1038/s41586-021-04349-7. www.nature.com/articles/s41586-021-04349-7

Related: Shimon Kolkowitz, Differential clock comparisons with a multiplexed optical lattice clock, Nature (2022). DOI: 10.1038/s41586-021-04344-y. www.nature.com/articles/s41586-021-04344-y

© 2022 AFP

Citation:
How world’s most precise clock could transform fundamental physics (2022, February 19)
retrieved 20 February 2022
from https://phys.org/news/2022-02-world-precise-clock-fundamental-physics.html

This document is su

% %item_read_more_button%% Hexbyte Glen Cove Educational Blog Repost With Backlinks — #metaverse #vr #ar #wordpress

Hexbyte Glen Cove Image: Hubble captures swirling galactic trio

Hexbyte Glen Cove

Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, W. Keel, Dark Energy Survey, Department of Energy, Fermilab, Dark Energy Survey Camera, (DECam), Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, NoirLab/National Science Foundation/AURA, Sloan Digital Sky Survey; Acknowledgment: J. Schmidt

The mass of dust and bright swirls of stars in this image are the distant galaxy merger IC 2431, which lies 681 million light-years from Earth in the constellation Cancer.

The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has captured what appears to be a triple galaxy in progress, as well as a tumultuous mixture of star formation and tidal distortions caused by the gravitational interactions of this galactic trio.

A thick cloud of dust obscures the center of this image—though light from a is piercing its outer extremities.

This image is from a series of Hubble observations investigating weird and wonderful found by the Galaxy Zoo citizen science .

Using Hubble’s powerful Advanced Camera for Surveys, astronomers took a closer look at some of the more unusual galaxies that volunteers identified.

The original Galaxy Zoo project was the largest galaxy census ever carried out and relied on crowdsourcing time from more than 100,000 volunteers to classify 900,000 unexamined galaxies.

The project achieved what would have been years of work for a professional astronomer in only 175 days and has led to a steady stream of similar astronomical citizen science projects.

Later Galaxy Zoo projects have included the largest ever studies of galaxy mergers and tidal dwarf galaxies, as well as the discovery of entirely new types of compact star-forming galaxies.



Citation:
Image: Hubble captures swirling galactic trio (2022, February 19)
retrieved 20 February 2022
from https://phys.org/news/2022-02-image-hubble-captures-swirling-galactic.html

This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no
part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.

% %item_read_more_button%% Hexbyte Glen Cove Educational Blog Repost With Backlinks — #metaverse #vr #ar #wordpress

Hexbyte Glen Cove Webb team brings 18 dots of starlight into hexagonal formation

Hexbyte Glen Cove

This early Webb alignment image, with dots of starlight arranged in a pattern similar to the honeycomb shape of the primary mirror, is called an “image array.” Credit: NASA/STScI/J. DePasquale

The James Webb Space Telescope team continues to make progress in aligning the observatory’s mirrors. Engineers have completed the first stage in this process, called “Segment Image Identification.” The resulting image shows that the team has moved each of Webb’s 18 primary mirror segments to bring 18 unfocused copies of a single star into a planned hexagonal formation.

With the image array complete, the team has now begun the second phase of alignment: “Segment Alignment.” During this stage, the team will correct large positioning errors of the mirror segments and update the alignment of the secondary mirror, making each individual dot of starlight more focused. When this “global alignment” is complete, the team will begin the third phase, called “Image Stacking,” which will bring the 18 spots of light on top of each other.

“We steer the segment dots into this array so that they have the same relative locations as the physical mirrors,” said Matthew Lallo, systems scientist and Telescopes Branch manager at the Space Telescope Science Institute. “During global alignment and Image Stacking, this familiar arrangement gives the wavefront team an intuitive and natural way of visualizing changes in the segment spots in the context of the entire primary . We can now actually watch the slowly form into its precise, intended shape!”



Citation:
Webb team brings 18 dots of starlight into hexagonal formation (2022, February 19)
retrieved 20 February 2022
from https://phys.org/news/2022-02-webb-team-dots-starlight-hexagonal.html

This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no
part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.

% %item_read_more_button%% Hexbyte Glen Cove Educational Blog Repost With Backlinks — #metaverse #vr #ar #wordpress