Hexbyte Glen Cove Drought-hit Jordan to build Red Sea desalination plant thumbnail

Hexbyte Glen Cove Drought-hit Jordan to build Red Sea desalination plant

Hexbyte Glen Cove

Jordan is one of the world’s most and is facing one of the most severe droughts in its history.

Jordan said Sunday it plans to build a Red Sea desalination plant operating within five years, to provide the mostly-desert and drought-hit kingdom with critical drinking water.

The cost of the project is estimated at “around $1 billion”, ministry of water and irrigation spokesman Omar Salameh told AFP, adding that the plant would be built in the Gulf of Aqaba, in southern Jordan.

The plant is expected to produce 250-300 million cubic meters of potable water per year, and should be ready for operation in 2025 or 2026, Salameh said.

“It will cover the need for drinking water (in Jordan) for the next two centuries,” he said, adding that the desalinated water would be piped from Aqaba on the Red Sea to the rest of the country.

Jordan is one of the world’s most water-deficient countries and experts say the country, home to 10 million people, is now in the grip of one of the most in its history.

Thirteen international consortiums have put in bids, and the government will chose five of them by July, Salameh said.

Desalinating water is a major drain of energy, and the companies must suggest how to run the plant in Jordan, which does not have major oil reserves.

Last month Salameh told AFP that Jordan needs about 1.3 billion cubic metres of water per year.

But the quantities available are around 850 to 900 million cubic metres, with the shortfall “due to low rainfall, , and successive refugee inflows”, he said.

This year, the reserves of key drinking dams have reached critical levels, many now a third of their normal capacity.



© 2021 AFP

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Drought-hit Jordan to build Red Sea desalination plant (2021, June 13)
retrieved 14 June 2021
from https://phys.org/news/2021-06-drought-hit-jordan-red-sea-desalination.html

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Hexbyte Glen Cove About 4,300 cold-stunned turtles survived the Texas freeze thumbnail

Hexbyte Glen Cove About 4,300 cold-stunned turtles survived the Texas freeze

Hexbyte Glen Cove

In this Feb. 16, 2021, file photo, thousands of Atlantic green sea turtles and Kemp’s ridley sea turtles suffering from cold stun are laid out to recover at the South Padre Island Convention Center on South Padre Island, Texas. About a third of the cold-stunned sea turtles found along Texas’ coast during last month’s deadly winter freeze survived following a massive rescue effort by experts and volunteers struggling themselves without power at home. The Sea Turtle Stranding and Salvage Network says that of the about 13,000 sea turtles found, about 4,300 have now been rehabilitated and released. (Miguel Roberts/The Brownsville Herald via AP, File)

About a third of the cold-stunned sea turtles found along Texas’ coast during last month’s deadly winter freeze survived following a massive rescue effort by experts and volunteers who were themselves struggling without power at home.

Of the approximately 13,000 sea turtles found, about 4,300 have been rehabilitated and released, according to the Sea Turtle Stranding and Salvage Network, a cooperative of federal, state and private partners coordinated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. It’s been the largest cold-stunning event for sea turtles recorded in the U.S. since the network was established in 1980.

While the majority of the sea turtles found during the winter storm were already dead, those that survived wouldn’t have if not for the rescuers, said Barbara Schroeder, NOAA’s national sea turtle coordinator. She said the water and air temperatures were “too cold for too long” for them to recover on their own.

“The event was so severe—the temperatures were so extreme—yes, they absolutely would have all died,” said Schroeder, who added that a small number are still being cared for.

As below-freezing temperatures hit the coast during the February storm, scientists, volunteers and even the U.S. Coast Guard joined the effort to rescue the immobile sea turtles from the water and shore.

“Mind you, while they’re bringing and rescuing all of these sea turtles, we didn’t have power or water, our gas stations ran out of gas,” said Wendy Knight, executive director at Sea Turtle Inc., a nonprofit on South Padre Island.

Her group took in so many sea turtles—over 5,300—that they had to start placing them in the South Padre Island Convention Center.

Ed Caum, executive director of the South Padre Island Convention and Visitors Bureau, said that for a while during the week of the storm a vehicle pulled up “every 15 minutes or less” and dropped off turtles.

When water temperatures drop below about 50 degrees (10 degrees Celsius), sea turtles become lethargic and are unable to swim. Surf temperatures dropped into the low 40s that week on South Padre Island.

Some of the cold-stunned sea turtles had other problems as well, including hook infections and injuries from boats, Knight said.

Almost all of the rescued sea turtles were green turtles, Schroeder said.

Once rescued, the turtles were slowly warmed up.

“You can’t warm them up really, really quickly. And some of the turtles that came in live did not make it,” said Christopher Marshall, director of the Gulf Center for Sea Turtle Research, which rescued sea turtles in the Galveston area.

He said that once the turtles they rescued were revived, they were taken to the Houston Zoo for a check-up and if they then passed a swim test, they were returned to the Gulf.

Knight said they have held a volunteer appreciation day and made T-shirts for those who helped rescue the turtles that say: “I survived the great cold stun.”

“There were hundreds, maybe even thousands, I couldn’t even guess at how many people we had involved,” Knight said.



© 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

Citation:
About 4,300 cold-stunned turtles survived the Texas freeze (2021, March 25)
retrieved 26 March 2021
from https://phys.org/news/2021-03-cold-stunned-turtles-survived-texas.html

This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no
part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.

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