A woman bought a sculpture at Goodwill for $34.99. It actually was a missing ancient Roman bust.

The Roman bust after it was bought by Laura Young. It was sold at a Goodwill in Austin, Texas for $34.99.   Credit: San Antonio Museum of Art

An ancient Roman bust from around the first century that had been missing for decades has finally made its way into the San Antonio Museum of Art, and all it took was for one artist to buy it from a Texas Goodwill for under $40.

In 2018, art collector Laura Young was shopping at a Goodwill store in Austin, Texas when she stumbled upon a sculpture on the floor beneath a table, according to the San Antonio Museum of Art. Someone that looks for undervalued or rare art pieces, Young told The Art Newspaper she bought the piece for $34.99, and a picture of it after she bought it shows it buckled up in her car with a price tag on its cheek.

After buying the bust, Young noticed it looked very old and worn, so she wanted to find out when and where it came from. Over the next couple of years, Young consulted with experts in at the University of Texas at Austin and those at auction houses across the United States looking for answers.

Eventually, Jörg Deterling, a consultant for the fine arts brokerage Sotheby’s, identified the bust as a piece that was once in a German decades ago, and connected her with German authorities.


Turns out, the sculpture is from late first century B.C. to early first century A.D. The museum believes it depicts a son of Pompey the Great, who was defeated in civil war by Julius Caesar, while The Art Newspaper reported the bust is believed to depict Roman commander Drusus Germanicus.

The bust had belonged to King Ludwig I of Bavaria, who lived from 1786 to 1868, and was part of a full-scale model he built of a house from Pompeii, called the Pompejanum, in Aschaffenburg, Germany. The model stood for nearly 200 years, but during World War II, it was severely damaged by Allied bombers.

No one is quite sure of how the bust went from being nearly destroyed to the Austin Goodwill, but the museum noted the U.S. Army established bases in Aschaffenburg that were in use until the Cold War, so a Texas soldier likely took it before returning home.

“It’s a great story whose plot includes the World War II-era, international diplomacy, art of the ancient Mediterranean, thrift shop sleuthing, historic Bavarian royalty, and the thoughtful stewardship of those who care for and preserve the arts, whether as individuals or institutions,” Emily Ballew Neff, Kelso director at the museum, said in a statement.

As part of an agreement with Bavarian Administration of State-Owned Palaces, Gardens, and Lakes, the Roman bust will be on display at the San Antonio Museum of Art from now until May 21, 2023. Afterwards, it will finally return to Germany.

Young said she was excited to discover the bust’s origins, but added it was bittersweet since she couldn’t keep or sell it.

“Either way, I’m glad I got to be a small part of (its) long and complicated history, and he looked great in the house while I had him,” she said.



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A woman bought a sculpture at Goodwill for $34.99. It actually was a missing ancient Roman bust. (2022, May 6)
retrieved 8 May 2022
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Hexbyte Glen Cove Desert country Jordan aims for green with 10-million tree campaign thumbnail

Hexbyte Glen Cove Desert country Jordan aims for green with 10-million tree campaign

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Eucalyptus and carob saplings are planted near the forest of Kufranjah, north of Jordan’s capital Amman, part of a reforestation effort that aims to reach 10 million trees in 10 years

On a bare hill in Jordan’s verdant Ajloun region, dozens of people plant saplings as part of a reforestation effort that aims to reach 10 million trees in 10 years.

“The in our region are beautiful,” says 11-year-old Mohammed al-Ananza, helping his father Mustafa plant a carob sapling.

“It’s a real shame that we have lost so many to fires… We should work together to protect them,” he says as they work near the Kufranjah forest north of the capital Amman.

Forests make up only one percent of the desert kingdom’s territory, according to the agriculture ministry, though Jordan also has an estimated 23 million orchard trees, half of them olives.

Forest fires strike almost every year in the Middle Eastern country due to high summer temperatures, in a trend scientists expect to intensify with climate change.

The blazes are often started by picnickers’ barbeques or carelessly discarded cigarettes.

There were 499 fires in wood and last year alone, according to the agriculture ministry.

“We must make up for what has been lost in the fires,” said Belal Qtishat, head of the nature protection department at the environment ministry.

“It’s the only way to fight desertification and and to protect biodiversity.”

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Hexbyte Glen Cove Islands without structure inside metal alloys could lead to tougher materials thumbnail

Hexbyte Glen Cove Islands without structure inside metal alloys could lead to tougher materials

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Proposed hierarchical deformation mechanism paradigm for the equi- atomic CrCoNi-based HEAs subjected to increasing degrees of deformation. Elastic deformation, dislocation-mediated plasticity, twinning-induced plasticity, TRIP, and finally solid-state amorphization. Triggering the next mechanism re- quires the generation of additional defects, i.e., dislocations and/or point defects (vacancies). These multiple mechanisms can interact, leading to a synergy of strengthening processes and a resulting highly complex microstructure. Credit: University of California San Diego

An international team of researchers produced islands of amorphous, non-crystalline material inside a class of new metal alloys known as high-entropy alloys.

This discovery opens the door to applications in everything from landing gears, to pipelines, to automobiles. The could make these lighter, safer, and more energy efficient.

The team, which includes researchers from the University of California San Diego and Berkeley, as well as Carnegie Mellon University and University of Oxford, details their findings in the Jan. 29 issue of Science Advances.

“These present a bright potential for increased strength and toughness since metallic glasses () have a strength that is vastly superior to that of crystalline metals and alloys,” said Marc Meyers, a professor in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at UC San Diego, and the paper’ s corresponding author.

Using , which can identify the arrangement of atoms, the researchers concluded that this amorphization is triggered by extreme deformation at high velocities. It is a new deformation mechanism that can increase the strength and toughness of these high entropy alloys even further.

The research is based on seminal work by Brian Cantor at the University of Oxford, and Jien-Wei Yeh at National Tsing Hua University in Taiwan. In 2004, both researchers led teams that reported the discovery of high-entropy alloys. This triggered a global search for new materials in the same class, driven by numerous potential applications in the transportation, energy, and defense industries.

“Significant new developments and discoveries in metal alloys are quite rare,” Meyers said.



More information:
“Amorphization in extreme deformation of the CrMnFeCoNi high-entropy alloy” Science Advances (2021). advances.sciencemag.org/lookup … .1126/sciadv.abb3108

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Islands without structure inside metal alloys could lead to tougher materials (2021, January 29)
retrieved 31 January 2021
from https://phys.org/news/2021-01-islands-metal-alloys-tougher-materials.html

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