Hexbyte Glen Cove Flash floods in Bosnia prompt evacuations, power outages

Hexbyte Glen Cove

by Sabina Niksic

Rescuers from Bosnia’s mountain rescue evacuate residents from their flooded homes in the village of Rajlovac, near Sarajevo, Bosnia, Friday, Nov. 5, 2021. Heavy rain has caused flash flooding in Bosnia, prompting evacuations and submerging local roads in some parts of the country on Friday. Credit: AP Photo

Heavy rain caused severe flash flooding in Bosnia, prompting evacuations, causing power outages in most of the capital, closing a key facility for oxygen used for COVID-19 patients and submerging roads in some parts of the Balkan country on Friday.

The only certified medicinal oxygen filling plant in Bosnia, part of Germany’s Messer Group, was among workplaces and homes in the suburbs of Sarajevo that had to be evacuated after being overrun by fast-moving .

Avdo Delic, general manager of Messer’s Bosnia branch, said the plant was completely submerged, and voiced concern that hospitals around the country treating COVID-19 patients might run out of medicinal oxygen cylinders unless the company’s operations are quickly restored at alternative locations.

“We could not save the equipment, we had to save lives,” Delic said.

“Water came fast like a tsunami and it is fortunate that the Civil Protection was there with rescue boats,” he added.

Bosnia is seeing an increase of COVID-19 hospitalizations amid a recent surge of the virus. The country of 3.5 million has one of the lowest vaccination rates in Europe at under 20%. On Friday, it reported some 1,100 new daily infections and 32 deaths.

So far, Bosnia has confirmed more than 250,000 infections and over 11,000 deaths, one of the highest death rates in Europe per capita.

Rescuers from Bosnia’s mountain rescue services help an elderly lady down the stairs before evacuating her from her home in the flooded village of Ahatovici, near Sarajevo, Bosnia, Friday, Nov. 5, 2021. Heavy rain has caused flash flooding in Bosnia, prompting evacuations and submerging local roads in some parts of the country on Friday. Credit: AP Photo

Hundreds of homes in the Sarajevo suburbs, along the rivers Bosnia, Tilava and Zeljeznica, and in the southwest part of the country, around the town of Konjic, had to be evacuated under unrelenting heavy downpours.

“Everything is under water, I just spoke with a friend who told me he cannot get out of his house because the water came up to the first floor,” said Salih Ramadani while walking away from his flooded home in the Sarajevo suburb of Otes.

“The situation is bad and we do not expect it to improve soon,” said Danis Memagic, a firefighter coordinating evacuations in the area.

Most parts of Sarajevo were left for hours without due to the flooding of one of the main substations on the outskirts of the city. The power transmission company, Elektroprijenos, said the heavy rain was hindering attempts to get the power rerouted. By evening, electricity was back in most of the city.

  • Rescuers from Bosnia’s mountain rescue services drag a boat with people rescued from their homes in the village of Ahatovici, near Sarajevo, Bosnia, Friday, Nov. 5, 2021. Heavy rain has caused flash flooding in Bosnia, prompting evacuations and submerging local roads in some parts of the country on Friday. Credit: AP Photo
  • A man sits on sandbags in the flooded village of Rajlovac, near Sarajevo, Bosnia, Friday, Nov. 5, 2021. Heavy rain has caused flash flooding in Bosnia, prompting evacuations and submerging local roads in some parts of the country on Friday. Credit: AP Photo
  • Rescuers from Bosnia’s mountain rescue evacuate residents from their flooded homes in the village of Rajlovac, near Sarajevo, Bosnia, Friday, Nov. 5, 2021. Heavy rain has caused flash flooding in Bosnia, prompting evacuations and submerging local roads in some parts of the country on Friday. Credit: AP Photo
  • A vehicle is partially submerged in the flooded village of Rajlovac, near Sarajevo, Bosnia, Friday, Nov. 5, 2021. Heavy rain has caused flash flooding in Bosnia, prompting evacuations and submerging local roads in some parts of the country on Friday. Credit: AP Photo
  • Rescuers from Bosnia’s mountain rescue services drag a boat while looking for people to be rescued from their homes in the village of Ahatovici, near Sarajevo, Bosnia, Friday, Nov. 5, 2021. Heavy rain has caused flash flooding in Bosnia, prompting evacuations and submerging local roads in some parts of the country on Friday. Credit: AP Photo
  • Police officers look at an overflowing river threatening buildings in Vojkovici near Sarajevo, Bosnia, Friday, Nov. 5, 2021. Heavy rain has caused flash flooding in Bosnia, prompting evacuations and submerging local roads in some parts of the country on Friday. Homes were flooded around Sarajevo while local roads were submerged in the southwest of the country, prompting some schools to cancel classes. Credit: AP Photo
  • A man uses his phone on a balcony overlooking a flooded street in the Sarajevo suburb of Ilidza, Bosnia, Friday, Nov. 5, 2021. Heavy rain has caused flash flooding in Bosnia, prompting evacuations and submerging local roads in some parts of the country on Friday. Credit: AP Photo
  • Parts of residential areas are submerged in high water in the Sarajevo suburb of Ilidza, Bosnia, Friday, Nov. 5, 2021. Heavy rain has caused flash flooding in Bosnia, prompting evacuations and submerging local roads in some parts of the country on Friday. Credit: AP Photo
  • Rescuers from Bosnia’s mountain rescue services help an elderly lady down the stairs before evacuating her from her home in the flooded village of Ahatovici, near Sarajevo, Bosnia, Friday, Nov. 5, 2021. Heavy rain has caused flash flooding in Bosnia, prompting evacuations and submerging local roads in some parts of the country on Friday. Credit: AP Photo
  • A dog stands in a flooded yard in the Sarajevo suburb of Ilidza, Bosnia, Friday, Nov. 5, 2021. Heavy rain has caused flash flooding in Bosnia, prompting evacuations and submerging local roads in some parts of the country on Friday. Credit: AP Photo
  • A wooden cross brought by overflowing river is stuck in the railing of a bridge in Butmir near Sarajevo, Bosnia, Friday, Nov. 5, 2021. Heavy rain has caused flash flooding in Bosnia, prompting evacuations and submerging local roads in some parts of the country on Friday. Credit: AP Photo
  • A man wades through a flooded street as a car drives by in the Sarajevo suburb of Ilidza, Bosnia, Friday, Nov. 5, 2021. Heavy rain has caused flash flooding in Bosnia, prompting evacuations and submerging local roads in some parts of the country on Friday. Credit: AP Photo
  • Men protect a house on a flooded street in the Sarajevo suburb of Ilidza, Bosnia, Friday, Nov. 5, 2021. Heavy rain has caused flash flooding in Bosnia, prompting evacuations and submerging local roads in some parts of the country on Friday. Credit: AP Photo
  • A car is submerged in a flooded street in the Sarajevo suburb of Ilidza, Bosnia, Friday, Nov. 5, 2021. Heavy rain has caused flash flooding in Bosnia, prompting evacuations and submerging local roads in some parts of the country on Friday. Credit: AP Photo
  • Men wade through a flooded street in the Sarajevo suburb of Ilidza, Bosnia, Friday, Nov. 5, 2021. Heavy rain has caused flash flooding in Bosnia, prompting evacuations and submerging local roads in some parts of the country on Friday. Credit: AP Photo

Footage of the floods in Vojkovici, outside Sarajevo, showed a local gas station and motel sitting precariously close to the fast-flowing, swollen and muddy Zeljava river which had eaten away its banks.

Rising rivers flooded many local roads around Bosnia, forcing some schools to cancel classes.

Rain started late on Thursday and forecasts say it will continue to fall until Sunday, raising fears of a repeat of record flooding that affected about a third of the population in 2014.

It followed days of unseasonably warm weather with temperatures over 20 degrees Celsius.



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Flash floods in Bosnia prompt evacuations, power outages (2021, November 6)
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Hexbyte Glen Cove World on 'catastrophic' path to 2.7C warming: UN chief thumbnail

Hexbyte Glen Cove World on ‘catastrophic’ path to 2.7C warming: UN chief

Hexbyte Glen Cove

A bombshell “code red” for humanity warned Earth’s average temperature will reach 1.5C a decade earlier than projected only three years ago.

A failure to slash global emissions is setting the world on a “catastrophic” path to 2.7 degrees Celsius heating, UN chief Antonio Guterres warned Friday just weeks before crunch climate talks.

His comments come as a United Nations report on global emissions pledges found instead of the reductions needed to avoid the worst effects of climate change, they would see “a considerable increase”.

This shows “the world is on a catastrophic pathway to 2.7-degrees of heating,” Guterres said in a statement.

The figure would shatter the temperature targets of the Paris climate agreement, which aimed for warming well below 2C and preferably capped at 1.5C above pre-industrial levels.

“Failure to meet this goal will be measured in the massive loss of lives and livelihoods,” Guterres said.

Under the landmark 2015 Paris deal, nations committed to slash emissions, as well as to provide assistance to the most climate-vulnerable countries.

But the window for action is narrowing as nations slow-walk their responses.

Last month a bombshell “code red” for humanity from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) warned that Earth’s average temperature will be 1.5C higher around 2030, a decade earlier than projected only three years ago.

“We have to act, all of us, we have to act now,” said US President Joe Biden on Friday, urging the world to bring its “highest” ambition to the UN climate conference in Glasgow in November.

“Those who have not yet done so, time is running out,” Biden said in the White House at the start of a virtual summit with nine foreign leaders.

‘Wrong direction’

With only 1.1C of warming so far, the world has seen a torrent of deadly weather disasters intensified by climate change in recent months, from asphalt-melting heatwaves to flash floods and untameable wildfires.

The IPCC says emissions should be around 45 percent lower by 2030 compared with 2010 levels to meet the 1.5C goal.

But current pledges by 191 countries would see emissions 16 percent higher at end of the decade than in 2010—a level that would eventually cause the world to warm 2.7C.

“Overall greenhouse gas emission numbers are moving in the wrong direction,” said UN climate chief Patricia Espinosa in a press conference.

But she said there was a “glimmer of hope” from 113 countries that had updated their pledges, including the United States and European Union.

These new pledges, known as Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs), would see their emissions reduced 12 percent by 2030 compared to 2010.

Big emitters

The Paris deal included a “ratchet” mechanism for countries to review and toughen up their climate pledges every five years.

Despite an end of 2020 deadline, many major emitters have yet to issue new targets.

That includes China—the world’s biggest emitter—which has said it will reach net zero emissions by 2060, but has not yet delivered its NDC to spell out emissions reductions by 2030.

Meanwhile updates from Brazil and Mexico were actually weaker than pledges they submitted five years ago, according to an analysis by the World Resources Institute.

The UN report was a “damning indictment” of global progress on climate, particularly by G20 nations, responsible for around 80 percent of emissions, said Mohamed Adow, who leads the think tank Power Shift Africa.

“They are the countries which have caused this crisis and yet are failing to show the leadership required to lead us out of this mess,” he said.

Time to ‘deliver’

Another unfulfilled pledge will be a flashpoint at the Glasgow summit—the promise by wealthy nations to provide annual climate funding of $100 billion from 2020 to poorer countries, who bear the greatest impact of warming.

The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development on Friday said progress was “disappointing”, with developing countries receiving $79.6 billion in 2019.

It warned that the 2020 target would be missed.

“The fight against climate change will only succeed if everyone comes together to promote more ambition, more cooperation and more credibility,” said Guterres.

“It is time for leaders to stand and deliver, or people in all countries will pay a tragic price.”



© 2021 AFP

Citation:
World on ‘catastrophic’ path to 2.7C warming: UN chief (2021, Septem

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Hexbyte Glen Cove Identifying the rise of multi drug resistant E. coli thumbnail

Hexbyte Glen Cove Identifying the rise of multi drug resistant E. coli

Hexbyte Glen Cove

Escherichia coli. Credit: Rocky Mountain Laboratories, NIAID, NIH

Antibiotic resistance in E. coli has been steadily increasing since the early 2000s despite attempts to control it, a new study suggests. In the biggest genomic survey of E. coli to date, that took more than 16 years in Norway, researchers have successfully tracked the spread of antibiotic resistant genes and have shown that these genes are being transferred between E. coli strains.

Researchers from the Wellcome Sanger Institute and University of Oslo have tracked in Norway and compared this to a previous study from the UK. They found that resistant strains developed around the same time, but increased more rapidly in the UK population.

The results, published today in The Lancet Microbe show that tracking these resistant strains is important in the surveillance and control of drug resistant E. coli, which poses a significant issue in hospitals where it can cause severe infection and mortality. In addition, understanding how these genes are transferred between strains, and what has caused them to acquire can help prevent the growth of antibiotic resistance strains.

The bacterium, Escherichia coli is a common cause of bloodstream infections world-wide*, which seem to be increasing over the last decade. E. coli is commonly found in the gut, where it does not cause harm, but if it gets into the bloodstream due to a weakened immune system it can cause severe and life threatening infections. As an added challenge for health care providers, multi-drug resistance (MDR) has become a frequent feature of such infections, and in a worrying number of cases the available treatment options are becoming limited.

In the largest study of its kind, and only the second systematic longitudinal genomic study of bacteremia E. coli, researchers from the Wellcome Sanger Institute and the University of Oslo processed a nation-wide catalogue of samples from more than 3,200 patients to track over 16 years. By harnessing the power of large-scale DNA sequencing, they tracked the emergence of drug resistance and compared this to a similar study conducted in the UK**.

The team found that MDR started to increase and show in more strains in the early 2000s due to antibiotic pressure, and now multiple MDR E. coli strains are present in Norway. However, MDR E. coli seems to be more widely present in the UK, despite similar policies in place around antibiotic use. The UK population however is considerably larger than Norway which could explain some of the differences. Further research is needed to allow for closer comparison and to identify the exact factors that cause rapid spread in some locations compared to others.

MDR is relatively rare in bacteria. However, this new study has identified that lineages that previously were not thought to have MDR have acquired drug-resistance genes, showing the increased ability of E. coli to share MDR genes that move horizontally between strains.

Professor Jukka Corander, co-author and Associate Faculty member at the Wellcome Sanger Institute, said: “The high number of samples from the Norwegian population and the level of genomic detail on the strains of bacteria enabled us to make much more far-reaching conclusions than were ever possible before. This study demonstrates the power arising from a systematic national surveillance of resistant organisms, which both collects and makes the data available for in-depth analyses. Without these in place, it would have been impossible to approach the central research questions formulated in the study and find answers to them.”

The researchers hope to conduct similar research in the UK to build on previous studies and gain a full data set of 16 years in the UK in order to more closely track MDR resistant E. coli.

Dr. Rebecca Gladstone, lead author of the study and Bioinformatician at the University of Oslo, Norway, said: “Being able to estimate the expansion timelines of the MDR clones of E. coli and to identify multiple occasions of novel acquisition of resistance genes is particularly exciting as this is the first time that this has been possible. Understanding and tracking the movement of these drug resistance genes and the that carry them are necessary for controlling the spread of drug-resistant bacteria, which is a huge issue in healthcare.”

Professor Julian Parkhill, co-author and Professor in the Department of Veterinary Medicine at University of Cambridge, said: “Long-term studies such as this one provide in-depth understanding about the complex epidemiology underlying bloodstream infections. The next step would be further research to detail the factors determining the success of emerging pathogenic clones of these bacteria, to help find a way to control and possibly minimise the spread of multidrug resistance.”



More information:
The Lancet Microbe, www.thelancet.com/journals/lan … (21)00031-8/fulltext

*Kern WV, Rieg S. (2020) Burden of bacterial bloodstream infection – A brief update on epidemiology and significance of multidrug-resistant pathogens. Clin Microbiol Infect; 26: 151-7.

**Teemu Kallonen et al. Systematic longitudinal survey of invasiveEscherichia coliin England demonstrates a stable population structure only transiently disturbed by the emergence of ST131, Genome Research (2017). DOI: 10.1101/gr.216606.116

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