Hexbyte Glen Cove Roman chariot unearthed 'almost intact' near Pompeii thumbnail

Hexbyte Glen Cove Roman chariot unearthed ‘almost intact’ near Pompeii

Hexbyte Glen Cove

The four-wheel processional chariot was missed by looters who tunneled by on either side

An ornate Roman chariot has been discovered “almost intact” near Italy’s buried city of Pompeii, the archaeological park announced on Saturday, calling it a discovery with “no parallel” in the country.

The four-wheeled processional carriage was found in the portico to stables where the remains of three horses were unearthed in 2018, including one still in its harness.

Pompeii was buried in boiling lava when Mount Vesuvius erupted in 79 AD, killing between 2,000 and 15,000 people.

“A large ceremonial chariot with four wheels, along with its iron components, beautiful bronze and tin decorations, mineralised wood remains and imprints of organic materials (from the ropes to the remains of floral decoration), has been discovered almost intact,” a statement issued by the said.

“This is an exceptional discovery… which has no parallel in Italy thus far—in an excellent state of preservation.”

The excavation site is known as the Civita Giuliana, a suburban villa that lies just a few hundred metres from the of Pompeii.

The excavation is part of a programme aimed at fighting in the area, including tunnel digging to reach artefacts that can be sold on illicit markets.

Looters missed the room where the chariot had lain for almost 2,000 years, tunnelling by on both sides, the park’s statement said.

Parts of the chariot have been preserved in fine detail

Specialists took great care to unearth the vehicle, for example by pouring plaster into voids “to preserve the imprint of any organic material” that had decomposed, it added.

The park said this had allowed it to emerge well preserved down to the imprints of ropes, “thus revealing the chariot in all of its complexity”.

“Pompeii continues to amaze with all of its discoveries, and it will continue to do so for many years yet, with 20 hectares (50 acres) still to be excavated,” Culture Minister Dario Franceschini was quoted as saying.

‘Parades and processions’

“It is an extraordinary discovery for the advancement of our knowledge of the ancient world,” added Massimo Osanna, outgoing director of the .

“What we have is a ceremonial chariot, probably the Pilentum referred to by some sources, which was employed not for everyday use or for agricultural transport, but to accompany community festivities, parades and processions.”

Pompeii’s remarkably well-preserved remains have slowly been uncovered by teams of archaeological specialists.

It is Italy’s third most visited tourist site, drawing more than 3.9 million visitors in 2019.

The ancient city was closed after the coronavirus struck, and only reopened on January 18.



© 2021 AFP

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Roman chariot unearthed ‘almost intact’ near Pompeii (2021, February 27)
retrieved 28 February 2021
from https://phys.org/news/2021-02-roman-chariot-unearthed-intact-pompeii.html

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Hexbyte Glen Cove Improving quantum dot interactions, one layer at a time thumbnail

Hexbyte Glen Cove Improving quantum dot interactions, one layer at a time

Hexbyte Glen Cove

Low quantum dot concentrations during superlattice fabrication suppresses quantum resonance between dots in the same layer, while high concentrations activates it. Credit: DaeGwi Kim, Osaka City University

Osaka City University scientists and colleagues in Japan have found a way to control an interaction between quantum dots that could greatly improve charge transport, leading to more efficient solar cells. Their findings were published in the journal Nature Communications.

Nanomaterials engineer DaeGwi Kim led a team of scientists at Osaka City University, RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science and Kyoto University to investigate ways to control a property called quantum in layered structures of quantum dots called superlattices.

“Our simple method for fine-tuning quantum resonance is an important contribution to both and nanoscale material processing,” says Kim.

Quantum dots are nanometer-sized semiconductor particles with interesting optical and . When light is shone on them, for example, they emit strong at room temperature, a property called photoluminescence. When quantum dots are close enough to each other, their electronic states are coupled, a phenomenon called quantum resonance. This greatly improves their ability to transport electrons between them. Scientists have been wanting to manufacture devices using this interaction, including solar cells, display technologies, and thermoelectric devices.

However, they have so far found it difficult to control the distances between quantum dots in 1D, 2-D and 3-D structures. Current fabrication processes use long ligands to hold quantum dots together, which hinders their interactions.

Kim and his colleagues found they could detect and control quantum resonance by using cadmium telluride quantum dots connected with short N-acetyl-L-cysteine ligands. They controlled the distance between quantum dot layers by placing a spacer layer between them made of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes. Quantum resonance is detected between stacked dots when the spacer layer is thinner than two nanometers. The scientists also controlled the distance between quantum dots in a single layer, and thus quantum resonance, by changing the concentration of quantum dots used in the layering process.

The team next plans to study the optical properties, especially photoluminescence, of quantum dot superlattices made using their layer-by-layer approach. “This is extremely important for realizing new optical electronic devices made with quantum dot superlattices,” says Kim.

Kim adds that their fabrication method can be used with other types of water-soluble quantum dots and nanoparticles. “Combining different types of semiconductor quantum dots, or combining semiconductor with other nanoparticles, will expand the possibilities of new material design,” says Kim.



More information:
TaeGi Lee et al. Controlling the dimension of the quantum resonance in CdTe quantum dot superlattices fabricated via layer-by-layer assembly, Nature Communications (2020). DOI: 10.1038/s41467-020-19337-0

Citation:
Improving quantum dot interactions, one layer at a time (2020, November 20)
retrieved 20 November 2020
from https://phys.org/news/2020-11-quantum-dot-interactions-layer.html

This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no
part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.

Read More Hexbyte Glen Cove Educational Blog Repost With Backlinks —