Hexbyte Glen Cove Growing climate anxiety poses significant threat to individuals and society

Hexbyte Glen Cove

Credit: CC0 Public Domain

Levels of eco-anxiety—the chronic fear of environmental doom—are growing, particularly among children and young people, and are likely to be significant and potentially damaging to individuals and society, warn experts in The BMJ today.

Mala Rao and Richard A Powell say neglecting the effects of increasing eco-anxiety “risks exacerbating health and between those more or less vulnerable to these psychological impacts,” while the socioeconomic effects—as yet hidden and unquantified—”will add considerably to the national costs of addressing the climate crisis.”

And they call on leaders to “recognize the challenges ahead, the need to act now, and the commitment necessary to create a path to a happier and healthier future, leaving no one behind.”

They point to a 2020 survey of child psychiatrists in England showing that more than half (57%) are seeing children and young people distressed about the climate crisis and the state of the environment.

And a recent international survey of climate anxiety in young people aged 16 to 25 showed that the psychological (emotional, cognitive, social, and functional) burdens of climate change are “profoundly affecting huge numbers of these young people around the world.”

These findings also offer insights into how young people’s emotions are linked with their feelings of betrayal and abandonment by governments and adults, they write. Governments are seen as failing to respond adequately, leaving with “no future” and “humanity doomed.”

So what is to be done to alleviate the rising levels of climate anxiety, they ask?

“The best chance of increasing optimism and hope in the eco-anxious young and old is to ensure they have access to the best and most reliable information on mitigation and adaptation,” they explain.

“Especially important is information on how they could connect more strongly with nature, contribute to greener choices at an individual level, and join forces with like-minded communities and groups.”

They conclude: “The is an , and fearfulness about the future cannot be fully tackled until a common united global strategy is put in place to address the root cause, , and to give everyone—especially the young and the most vulnerable communities—the hope of a better future.”



Citation:
Growing climate anxiety poses significant threat to individuals and society (2021, October 6)
retrieved 7 October 2021
from https://phys.org/news/2021-10-climate-anxiety-poses-significant-threat.html

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Hexbyte Glen Cove Medicine-carriers made from human cells can cure lung infections thumbnail

Hexbyte Glen Cove Medicine-carriers made from human cells can cure lung infections

Hexbyte Glen Cove

Lung tissue. Credit: Rutgers University

Scientists used human white blood cell membranes to carry two drugs, an antibiotic and an anti-inflammatory, directly to infected lungs in mice.

The nano-sized delivery method developed at Washington State University successfully treated both the and inflammation in the mice’s lungs. The study, recently published in Communications Biology, shows a potential new strategy for treating infectious diseases, including COVID-19.

“If a doctor simply gives two drugs to a patient, they don’t go directly to the lungs. They circulate in the whole body, so potentially there’s a lot of toxicity,” said Zhenjia Wang, the study’s corresponding author and an associate professor in WSU’s College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences. “Instead, we can load the two types of drugs into these vesicles that specifically target the lung inflammation.”

Wang and his research team have developed a method to essentially peel the membrane from neutrophils, the most common type of white blood cells that lead the body’s immune system response. Once emptied, these membranes can be used as nanovesicles, tiny empty sacks only 100 to 200 nanometers wide, which scientists can then fill with medicine.

These nanovesicles retain some of the properties of the original white blood cells, so when they are injected into a patient, they travel directly to the inflamed area just as the cells would normally, but these nanovesicles carry the medicines that the scientists implanted to attack the infection.

In this study, first author Jin Gao, a WSU research associate, loaded the nanovesicles with an antibiotic and resolvinD1, an anti-inflammatory derived from Omega 3 fatty acids, to treat lungs infected by P. aeruginosa, a common potentially fatal pathogen patients can catch in hospital settings. The researchers used two drugs because lung infections often create two problems, the infection itself and inflammation created by a strong .

Toxicity studies and would have to be conducted before this method could be used in , but this study provides evidence that the innovation works for lung inflammation. If the method is ultimately proven safe and effective for humans, Wang said the nanovesicles could be loaded with any type of drug to treat a range of , including COVID-19.

“I think it’s possible to translate this technology to help treat COVID-19,” said Wang. “COVID-19 is a virus, not a bacterial pathogen, but it also causes an inflammation response in the , so we could load an antiviral drug like remdesivir into the nanovesicle, and it would target that inflammation.”



More information:
Jin Gao et al, Co-delivery of resolvin D1 and antibiotics with nanovesicles to lungs resolves inflammation and clears bacteria in mice, Communications Biology (2020). DOI: 10.1038/s42003-020-01410-5

Citation:
Medicine-carriers made from human cells can cure lung infections (2020, December 3)
retrieved 5 December 2020
from https://phys.org/news/2020-12-medicine-carriers-human-cells-lung-infections.html

This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no

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