kinsta.com-knowledgebase-net-err_cert_common_name_invalid

kinsta.com-knowledgebase-net-err_cert_common_name_invalid

Understanding What Causes the NET::ERR_CERT_COMMON_NAME_INVALID Error

Before we dive into what causes the NET::ERR_CERT_COMMON_NAME_INVALID error, let’s break down the relevant terms. The ‘common name’ this error references is the domain on which an SSL certificate is installed.

For example, if you have a website at mydomain.com, the common name on your SSL certificate would be mydomain.com. So as the error message states, the root problem behind NET::ERR_CERT_COMMON_NAME_INVALID is that the common name on your SSL certificate is not valid for some reason.

Often, this means that the name on your certificate does not match the domain it’s installed on. However, there are other scenarios that could lead to this message appearing in your browser, including:

As you can see, many different factors can contribute to the NET::ERR_CERT_COMMON_NAME_INVALID error. This can make it hard to pin down the correct solution, but a little patience will go a long way towards helping you fix the problem.

Hexbyte Glen Cove Community policing found to be ineffective in improving trust or reducing crime

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Credit: Unsplash/CC0 Public Domain

An international team of researchers has found that instituting community policing into several communities in six countries in the Southern Hemisphere did little to improve trust in police and did not reduce crime rates. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes how they conducted experiments designed to test the effectiveness of community policing and what they learned from them. Santiago Tobón, with Universidad EAFIT, Medellín, Antioquia, Colombia, has published a Perspective piece in the same journal issue, explaining the ideas behind community policing and outlining the work done by the team.

Community policing involves members of the spending more time among the people they serve in their local communities. And as they do so, they are expected to get to know the people and to learn more about their problems in order to help when they can. The idea is that such efforts will improve trust between police and the public they are sworn to serve, and that members of the public will be more forthcoming and cooperative in helping to identify those who commit a crime. In this new effort, the researchers wondered if community policing works as intended in different countries, such as those with low incomes and with varied crime histories.

To find out, they set up six field studies in Brazil, Colombia, Liberia, Pakistan, the Philippines, and Uganda. Each required the coordinated efforts of local police, people in the community and community leaders. Police were asked to start a community policing policy and as they did so, the researchers tracked the results.

At the conclusion of the field studies, the researchers found that across the board, instituting community policing did little to improve trust in the police and did not impact local .

Science also published a Research Article earlier this year looking at the possible role of gender and race in police and civilian interactions in Chicago. And this past October Science published an Introduction to a Special Issue, discussing the impact of racial disparity on the U.S. prison system.



More information:
Graeme Blair et al, Community policing does not build citizen trust in police or reduce crime in the Global South, Science (2021). DOI: 10.1126/science.abd3446

Santiago Tobón, Community policing in the developing world, Science (2021). DOI: 10.1126/science.abm4112

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Community policing found to be ineffective in improving trust or reducing crime (2021, November 28)
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Hexbyte Glen Cove Testing social scientists with replication studies shows them capable of changing their beliefs

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Credit: Pixabay/CC0 Public Domain

A team of researchers from the University of Alabama, the University of Melbourne and the University of California has found that social scientists are able to change their beliefs regarding the outcome of an experiment when given the chance. In a paper published in the journal Nature Human Behavior, the group describes how they tested the ability of scientists to change their beliefs about a scientific idea when shown evidence of replicability. Michael Gordon and Thomas Pfeifer with Massey University have published a News & Views piece in the same journal issue explaining why scientists must be able to update their beliefs.

The researchers set out to study a conundrum in science. It is generally accepted that scientific progress can only be made if scientists update their beliefs when new ideas come along. The conundrum is that scientists are human beings and human beings are notoriously difficult to sway from their beliefs. To find out if this might be a problem in general science endeavors, the researchers created an environment that allowed for testing the possibility.

The work involved sending out questionnaires to 1,100 asking them how they felt about the outcome of several recent well-known studies. They then conducted replication efforts on those same studies to determine if they could reproduce the findings by the researchers in the original efforts. They then sent the results of their replication efforts to the social scientists who had been queried prior to their effort, and once again asked them how they felt about the results of the original team.

In looking at their data, and factoring out related biases, they found that most of those scientists that participated lost some confidence in the results of studies when the researchers could not replicate results and gained some confidence in them when they could. The researchers suggest that this indicates that scientists, at least those in social fields, are able to rise above their beliefs when faced with , ensuring that science is indeed allowed to progress, despite it being conducted by fallible human beings.



More information:
Alex D. McDiarmid et al, Psychologists update their beliefs about effect sizes after replication studies, Nature Human Behaviour (2021). DOI: 10.1038/s41562-021-01220-7

Michael Gordon et al, Can scientists change their minds?, Nature Human Behaviour (2021). DOI: 10.1038/s41562-021-01201-w

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Testing social scientists with replication studies shows them capable of changing their beliefs (2021, November 28)
retrieved 29 November 2021
from https://phys.org/news/2021-11-social-scientists-replication-capable-beliefs.html

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Hexbyte Glen Cove Creating a less fragile diamond using fullerenes

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Structural comparison: crystalline diamond (left) and paracrystalline diamond (right). On the right, units of carbon atoms arranged in a cube shape are marked in turquoise, units of carbon atoms arranged in a hexagonal shape are marked in yellow. Irregular structures are marked in red. Credit: Hu Tang.

A team of researchers from China, Germany and the U.S. has developed a way to create a less fragile diamond. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describes their approach to creating a paracrystalline diamond and possible uses for it.

Prior research has shown that diamond is the hardest known material but it is also fragile—despite their hardness, can be easily cut or even smashed. This is because of their ordered atomic structure. Scientists have tried for years to synthesize diamonds that retain their hardness but are less fragile. The team has now come close to achieving that goal.

Currently, the way to create diamonds is to place a carbon-based material in a vice-like device where it is heated to very high temperatures while it is squeezed very hard. In this new effort, the researchers have used the same approach to create a less ordered type of diamond but have added a new twist—the carbon-based material was a batch of fullerenes, also known as buckyballs ( arranged in a hollow spherical shape). They heated the material to between 900 and 1,300 °C at pressures of 27 to 30 gigapascals. Notably, the pressure exerted was much lower than is used to make commercial diamonds. During processing, the spheres were forced to collapse, and they formed into transparent paracrystalline diamonds which could be extracted at room temperature.

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Hexbyte Glen Cove ‘Gangotri wave’ connecting two of Milky Way’s spiral arms discovered

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Hexbyte Glen Cove A 3D ink made of living cells for creating living structures

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Fig. 1: Schematics of the design strategy, production, and functional applications of microbial ink. a E. coli was genetically engineered to produce microbial ink by fusing α (knob) and γ (hole) protein domains, derived from fibrin to the main structural component of curli nanofibers, CsgA. Upon secretion, the CsgA-α and CsgA-γ monomers self-assemble into nanofibers crosslinked by the knob-hole binding interaction. b The knob and hole domains are derived from fibrin, where they play a key role in supramolecular polymerization during blood clot formation. c The protocol to produce microbial ink from the engineered protein nanofibers involves standard bacterial culture, limited processing steps, and no addition of exogenous polymers. Microbial ink was 3D printed to obtain functional living materials. Credit: DOI: 10.1038/s41467-021-26791-x

A team of researchers from Harvard University and Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, has developed a type of living ink that can be used to print living materials. In their paper published in the journal Nature Communications, the group describes how they made their ink and possible uses for it.

For several years, microbial engineers have been working to develop a means to create living materials for use in a wide variety of applications such as medical devices. But getting such materials to conform to desired 3D structures has proven to be a daunting task. In this new effort, the researchers have taken a new approach to tackling the problem—engineering Escherichia coli to produce a product that can be used as the basis for an ink for use in a 3D printer.

The work began by bioengineering the bacteria to produce living nanofibers. The researchers then bundled the fibers and added other ingredients to produce a type of living ink that could be used in a conventional 3D printer. Once they found the concept viable, the team bioengineered other microbes to produce other types of living fibers or materials and added them to the ink. They then used the ink to print 3D objects that had living components. One was a material that secreted azurin—an anticancer drug—when stimulated by certain chemicals. Another was a material that sequestered Bisphenol A (a toxin that has found its way into the environment) without assistance from other chemicals or devices.

The researchers believe that their concept suggests that producing such inks could be a self-creating proposition. Engineering could be added to the microbes to push them to produce carbon copies of themselves—the ink could literally be grown in a jar. They also state that it appears possible that the technique could be used to print renewable building that would not only grow but could self heal—a possible approach to building self-sustaining homes here on Earth, or on the moon or on Mars.



More information:
Anna M. Duraj-Thatte et al, Programmable microbial ink for 3D printing of living materials produced from genetically engineered protein nanofibers, Nature Communications (2021). DOI: 10.1038/s41467-021-26791-x

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A 3D ink made of living cells for creating living structures (2021, November 27)
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from https://phys.org/news/2021-11-3d-ink-cells.html

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Hexbyte Glen Cove Giving male Bornean rock frogs testosterone found to exaggerate their kicking gestures

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Credit: DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2021.1848

A team of researchers from Brown University, the University of Vienna and Smith College has found that giving male Bornean rock frogs testosterone pushes them to exaggerate their provocative kicking gestures. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group suggests their experiments show that the kicking gesture evolved as a means to intimidate other males by taking advantage of their visual system.

Prior research has shown that the kicking gestures of the male Bornean frogs intimidate other male rivals. Females will mate with any male; thus, males have to take action if they want to ensure they produce offspring. Prior research has also shown that Bornean rock frogs tend to react in to things that move but that do not look like . Also, Bornean rock frogs live near rapidly moving water or waterfalls, which means they cannot hear anything going on around them most of the time. The constant noise, it has been theorized, prompted the kicking gestures because the males cannot make threatening noises like other species. In this new effort, the researchers theorized that the kicking gesture was related to the worm reaction—it looks very nearly the opposite of a moving worm, which means it can be used in an intimidating way.

To test their theory, the researchers captured some of the frogs and gave them a small dose of . They believed that doing so would push the frogs to accentuate their kicking gesture to be even more intimidating to other males, thereby allowing them to mate with nearby females without interference. Testing showed that was exactly what happened. The testosterone incited much more theatrical kicks, potentially scaring rivals more than they would have otherwise. The researchers have not tested the other males yet, to see if the exaggerated kicking does actually incite more fear, but they suggest that the kicking gesture is related to fear of non-wormlike movement. But it will take some time and patience to find out for sure—waiting for the males to do their kicking sometimes took hours.



More information:
Nigel K. Anderson et al, Testosterone amplifies the negative valence of an agonistic gestural display by exploiting receiver perceptual bias, Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences (2021). DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2021.1848

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Giving male Bornean rock frogs testosterone found to exaggerate their kicking gestures (2021, November 27)
retrieved 28 November 2021
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Hexbyte Glen Cove Two exoplanets orbiting a sun-like star discovered

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Hexbyte Glen Cove Trees found to reduce land surface area temperatures in cities up to 12°C

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Credit: Unsplash/CC0 Public Domain

A team of researchers with the Institute for Atmospheric and Climate Science, ETH Zurich, has found evidence that indicates that stands of trees can reduce land surface area temperatures in cities up to 12°C. In their paper published in the journal Nature Communications, the group describes how they analyzed satellite imagery for hundreds of cities across Europe and what they learned.

Prior research has suggested that adding to cities can help reduce high air temperatures during the warm months—cities are typically hotter than surrounding areas due to the huge expanses of asphalt and cement that absorb heat. In this new effort, the researchers looked at possible impacts on land surface areas instead of air temperatures. Such temperatures are not felt as keenly as air temperatures by people in the vicinity because it is below their feet rather than surrounding them.

The work by the team involved analyzing data from satellites equipped with land surface temperature sensors. In all, the researchers poured over data from 293 cities across Europe, comparing land surface temperatures in parts of cities that were covered with trees with similar nearby urban areas that were not covered with trees. For comparison purposes, they did the same for rural settings covered in pastures and farmland.

They found urban areas with trees typically had land surface temperatures that were two to four times cooler than similar areas nearby that had no tree cover. Such differences translated to approximately 0 to 4 K lower than surrounding areas in parts of Southern Europe—in other regions, such as Central Europe, the differences were as high as 8 to 12 K. Interestingly, the researchers found no such differences in rural areas. And they found no differences for other types of vegetation in the cities.

The researchers note that trees are able keep the ground cooler due to the shade they provide, which suggests they help reduce building surface temperatures in similar ways. Their work highlights the impact that adding tree cover to can have.



More information:
Jonas Schwaab et al, The role of urban trees in reducing land surface temperatures in European cities, Nature Communications (2021). DOI: 10.1038/s41467-021-26768-w

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Citation:
Trees found to reduce land surface area temperatures in cities up to 12°C (2021, November 26)
retrieved 27 November 2021
from https://phys.org/news/2021-11-trees-surface-area-temperatures-cities.html

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Hexbyte Glen Cove Radar remote sensing reveals magnitudes and patterns of large-scale permafrost ground deformation

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Seasonal and linear ground deformation on the central Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. Credit: Chen Jie

Permafrost on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau (QTP) undergoes significant thawing and degradation under climate warming. Ground deformation is a key indicator of permafrost degradation, which can be quantified via the advanced multi-temporal Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) techniques.

However, due to the strong heterogeneity of freeze-thaw processes, the magnitudes and patterns of large-scale ground deformation on QTP is not fully understood.

Researchers from the Northwest Institute of Eco-Environment and Resources of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) developed a Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)-Land-Surface-Temperature-Integrated InSAR approach to reconstruct the -related ground deformation, and they observed widespread seasonal and long-term ground deformation on the central QTP.

By applying the geophysical detector and spatial analysis, the researchers found that terrain slope is the main factor controlling the seasonal deformation. Strong magnitudes and variations of seasonal deformation are most pronounced in flat or gentle-slope regions due to the high water capacity.

In addition, according to the researchers, a linear subsidence is higher in the regions with high ground ice content and warm permafrost.

These findings reveal that under continuous warming, the transition from cold permafrost to warm permafrost may lead to more extensive ground ice loss.

This study demonstrates the capability of the permafrost-tailored InSAR approaches to quantify the magnitudes and spatial variations of the freeze-thaw processes and the melting of ground ice under different surface conditions (such as different terrains, , ice-rich or ice-poor permafrost) at a high resolution over a large scale.

In the remote or inaccessible permafrost regions on QTP or in the Arctic, this study provides practical permafrost-tailored InSAR methods and strategies to map and quantify the freeze-thaw processes and the degradation of permafrost over large areas, which is valuable for understanding the permafrost response to climate warming and local disturbance.

This work has been published in Remote Sensing of Environment. The ground deformation maps on the central QTP can be downloaded at National Cryosphere Desert Data Center.



More information:
Jie Chen et al, Magnitudes and patterns of large-scale permafrost ground deformation revealed by Sentinel-1 InSAR on the central Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, Remote Sensing of Environment (2021). DOI: 10.1016/j.rse.2021.112778

Citation:
Radar remote sensing reveals magnitudes and patterns of large-scale permafrost ground deformation (2021, November 26)
retrieved 27 November 2021
from https://phys.org/news/2021-11-radar-remote-reveals-magnitudes-patterns.html

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