Hexbyte – Glen Cove – News A peek at legendary architect John Storyk’s design process -Hexbyte Glen Cove News

Hexbyte – Glen Cove – News A peek at legendary architect John Storyk’s design process -Hexbyte Glen Cove News

Hexbyte – Glen Cove – News

John Storyk, the founder of WSDG, an acoustic consulting and A/V integration firm, is a legend in the music world. He’s a world-class architect and acoustic designer whose built recording studios for everyone from Jimi Hendrix to Jay-Z.

As someone whose built more than 4,000 audio/video studios, he knows a thing or two about getting a project started, getting over the wall, and seeing a vision come to life.

Hexbyte - Glen Cove - News
Electric Lady Studios. Credit: Cheryl Fleming Photography

Storyk’s one of those enigmatic and wonderful people with one foot planted firmly in the world of engineering and craftsmanship, and the other kicking dandelions in a world of art and passion. He talks about the architects who’ve inspired him – Frederick Keisler, Frank Lloyd Wright, Le Cobusier – with the reverence of a storyteller. But when it comes to his process, his tone is more analytical:

You can either wait for a lightning bolt — you can stand outside in the rain and try to attract one, there’s nothing wrong with that – or you can nibble at it from the bottom. Good questions bring good answers, so you start asking questions and the answers will tell you what to do.

He told TNW he was working on a new project and had run up against a wall, one of those design problems you just have to think about until you figure it out. We asked him how he usually works through those pain points, he chuckled:

I don’t really think about anything else. I just figure it out. I get grumpy, everybody – especially my wife – knows. I get distracted. But I’ll figure it out. I’ll decide how I want the rooms to come together and it’ll all click.

Storyk’s 73 years old, but it’s obvious that passion keeps him young. He talks about owning homes in three different countries and working for legendary musicians with the same gravitas as playing softball or sketching designs by hand. He lives in the moment:

Time goes by at exactly the right speed. I don’t subscribe to this idea that time flies. I don’t have things I regret – well, I’ll tell you: last night during the 7th inning I did wish I was younger. But otherwise, I don’t worry about that.

Hexbyte - Glen Cove - News
Credit: Cheryl Fleming Photography
New York University. Credit: Cheryl Fleming Photography

All things considered, Storyk‘s philosophy on design seems to be simple:

It is simple. I don’t know any other way to do things. You just start asking questions, some of them will have answers. How loud are you going to be? How loud are your neighbors? Some of them won’t, and that’s fine. You answer those questions by answering the previous ones.

The process remains the same. If you’re a contractor building a 10,000 square foot building or you’re a designer making a custom $10,000 piece of furniture, the process is still the same.

Not everyone has a meticulous mind for the kind of details that an architect of Storyk‘s calibur has, but it’s even rarer that such a detail-oriented mind has such creative device. We asked what it’s like to mentally ride the line between STEM and art, but his only explanation was “it’s just what I do.” Perhaps that explains why he has no plans of stopping anytime soon.

Hexbyte - Glen Cove - News
Credit: Cheryl Fleming Photography
Jungle City Studios. Credit: Cheryl Fleming Photography

Some ten minutes after our interview was scheduled to end, he let TNW listen to the music he was playing before our call  — a rocking tune from “Little Feat.” After a few seconds he tells us, “all I ever wanted was to play the piano like that.”

Yet when asked why he doesn’t stop designing and go play the piano or ride off into the sunset, he answers without hesitation:

It’s the thing I’m best at. That’s the only answer. I love the piano, I play twenty minutes everyday. But what I do isn’t really work to me. It’s not something I want to stop doing, I enjoy it.

Nobody, not even John Storyk, can tell you how to design like John Storyk. But according to him: whether you’re a novice or a master, the process is the same. You’ll just have to come up with your own passion.

Read next:

Google data shows 2-factor authentication blocks 100% of automated bot hacks

Read More

Hexbyte – Glen Cove – News Night Photography of Urban Japan -Hexbyte Glen Cove News

Hexbyte – Glen Cove – News Night Photography of Urban Japan -Hexbyte Glen Cove News

Hexbyte – Glen Cove – News

Photographer Jun Yamamoto (a.k.a. jungraphy) takes these subdued (but somehow also vibrant) photos of Japanese cities at night. This one in particular caught my eye:

Hexbyte - Glen Cove - News Jun Yamamoto

I’m assuming the photos are processed to get that moody red/blue/black color palette.

More about…

Read More

Hexbyte – Glen Cove – News Cerine Minimalist Lighting by Trueing -Hexbyte Glen Cove News

Hexbyte – Glen Cove – News Cerine Minimalist Lighting by Trueing -Hexbyte Glen Cove News

Hexbyte – Glen Cove – News

Cerine is a minimalist lighting collection designed by Brooklyn-based studio Trueing for this year’s New York Design Week. Each composed of handcrafted glass chains as the core design element, the series consists of two pendants, a floor lamp, and a sconce.

Hexbyte - Glen Cove - News

Japanese label pas de calais will be hosting the new collaborative pieces within their SoHo flagship store. The store’s windows on Wooster Street will frame the new lighting fixtures, complementing the iconic landmarked cast-iron building’s 10ft casements.

As an homage to the ubiquitous chain link, which is generally used mainly for functional purposes, the links play an integral part in both the utilitarian and decorative attributes of the fixtures. Inspiration for the chains arose from the likes of delicate golden chains to the massive metal anchors found in ship yards in equal measure.

Hexbyte - Glen Cove - News

Hexbyte - Glen Cove - News

Hexbyte - Glen Cove - News

Hexbyte - Glen Cove - News

Hexbyte - Glen Cove - News

Hexbyte - Glen Cove - News

Hexbyte - Glen Cove - News

Hexbyte - Glen Cove - News

Hexbyte - Glen Cove - News

Hexbyte - Glen Cove - News

Hexbyte - Glen Cove - News

Hexbyte - Glen Cove - News

Hexbyte - Glen Cove - News

Hexbyte - Glen Cove - News

Hexbyte - Glen Cove - News

Hexbyte - Glen Cove - News

Hexbyte - Glen Cove - News

Hexbyte - Glen Cove - News

Photography by Lauren Coleman.

Read More

Hexbyte  Tech News  Wired YouTube Continues to Fail Its Queer Creators

Hexbyte Tech News Wired YouTube Continues to Fail Its Queer Creators

Hexbyte Tech News Wired

Welcome to the umpteenth #YouTubeIsOverParty. Yesterday, YouTube decided that when right-wing commentator Steven Crowder calls Vox video host Carlos Maza, who is gay and of Cuban descent, a “Mexican” “lispy queer,” it does not violate the platform’s policies on harassment. Not even after Maza called it to their attention. Not even after YouTube admitted the language Crowder used was “clearly hurtful.” The decision may not make much sense, but for those who follow YouTube, it’s totally unsurprising.

Maza has been dealing with Crowder for two years, ever since Crowder decided to start “debunking” Maza’s YouTube series, Strikethrough, a show about politics, media, and technology. Nothing wrong with a bit of political debate, but for Crowder those debates include things that he calls “harmless ribbing” but actually sound a lot like open bigotry.

Last week, Maza compiled Crowder’s “jokes” into a shocking video that motivated YouTube to open an investigation into Crowder’s content. To Maza and many others, Crowder’s engagement in homophobic harassment was unambiguous: During part of the clip, he’s wearing a shirt that says “Socialism is for F*gs” around an image of a limp-wristed Che Guevara; he sells the shirt to his YouTube subscribers. It seemed obvious, all told, that what was in Maza’s compilation would be considered an infraction against YouTube’s harassment and cyberbullying policy, which includes a stipulation against posting “hurtful and negative personal comments/videos about another person.” However, that was not the case.

It’s not that YouTube doesn’t think this is a problem. It’s that they didn’t think it was their problem. According to YouTube, Crowder’s remarks don’t break the terms of service because he hasn’t directly incited his followers to harass Maza and because they believe Crowder’s commentary was primarily about debating opinions. But mere hours after the company tweeted at Maza saying Crowder’s actions wouldn’t lead to his videos being removed from the site, YouTube announced that they had demonetized Crowder’s account because “a pattern of egregious behavior has harmed the broader community,” violating YouTube’s Partner Program policies. In other words: Wait, everybody’s mad? Time to rethink things. (Predictably, far-right outlets are already frothing about censorship and political correctness gone wild.)

Emma Grey Ellis covers memes, trolls, and other elements of Internet culture for WIRED.

The flip-flop might have been forgivable if it made any sense, and if it hadn’t been part of a years-long pattern of YouTube failing its LGBTQ+ creators. YouTube’s Partner Program guidelines include its community guidelines and terms of service and doesn’t add much to them. The policy they’re citing, enacted after YouTuber Logan Paul filmed a dead body in Japan’s Aokigahara Forest last year, just makes it clear that demonetization can be a penalty for accounts violating the spirit of those rules. As Maza pointed out on Twitter, demonetization is hardly a punishment when most creators make their money from brand deals, speaking gigs, merch sales, and Patreon. In fact, demonetization is something of a joke among YouTubers. Even after scandal and demonetization, Logan Paul still reportedly made $14.5 million last year. And even though Crowder referred to the day’s events in a Twitter video as “adpocalypse,” he promised his followers there was a “silver lining” on the horizon, adding that “Vox [is] still gonna be pissed” because “their goal is to get rid of people.”

Queasiest of all, YouTube’s choice to demonetize Crowder means that the penalty for posting anti-LGBTQ+ content can be the same as the penalty for existing on the platform while queer. Last June—yeah, Pride month again—YouTube apologized to LGBTQ+ creators for demonetizing their videos for no reason (many creators alleged that putting the word “trans” in their video titles is what triggered the demonetization) and for allowing hateful, homophobic ads to run ahead of their videos. Before that scandal, there was the “family friendly” filter fiasco, which scrubbed even the most G-rated queer-adjacent content, like Tegan and Sara music videos, from people’s screens.

Anti-LGBTQ+ harassment is causing “egregious harm” on YouTube even when it doesn’t make headlines. Ash Hardell, a trans YouTuber, has been the target of “countless” transphobic videos, sometimes from people with wide-reaching influence. “Hurting me in this way gained this person enormous traffic to their channel,” Hardell says. “The video is now one of the most successful videos they have posted. YouTube absolutely rewards conflict and harassment with clicks, views, and money.” That’s terrible no matter where it happens. But on a platform that prides itself on fostering the LGBTQ+ community online, that encourages its queer creators to participate in its public relations campaigns, that rainbow-washes its own logo, such moves play out as awfully hypocritical.

The Maza/Crowder debacle is just one of many issues YouTube is currently facing and struggling to address. The platform has spent the week rolling out “new” policies hoping to appease the angry masses, but it hasn’t actually changed much and has so far been unclear about how it will enforce the new policies or punish offenders. Creators like Maza see right through it.

If YouTube wants to do right by its queer creators, a community that brings millions of viewers to the site every day, it needs to decide what harassment actually is. It can start by listening.


More Great WIRED Stories

Read More

Hexbyte  Tech News  Wired Ingenious Audio Designs From Audeze, Bang & Olufsen, Devialet, and Cambridge Audio

Hexbyte Tech News Wired Ingenious Audio Designs From Audeze, Bang & Olufsen, Devialet, and Cambridge Audio

Hexbyte Tech News Wired

Wireless technology is helping audio gear explore new horizons in form and functionality.

Stephanie Gonot

1. Devialet Phantom Reactor

If I close my eyes and listen, I almost forget that this wireless speaker is no bigger than a pineapple. But I keep my eyes wide open because the Reactor is mesmerizing: The 600 watts of power generated by its hybrid analog-digital amp send the side-mounted bass drivers fluttering like a butterfly’s wings. Connectivity over Bluetooth, AirPlay, or Spotify Connect gives me multiple ways to annoy my neighbors.

$1,090

Stephanie Gonot

2. Cambridge Audio Alva TT

I’ve spun my share of Bluetooth record players; most make vinyl sound flat and lifeless. But this British-engineered turntable is the first to support the high-resolution aptX HD Bluetooth standard that preserves all the groovy drama. With its one-piece tone arm and custom-designed stylus, the tether-free rig made my LPs sound as vibrant as those played on my wired system.

$1,700

Stephanie Gonot

3. Bang & Olufsen Beosound Edge

The Danish wizards at B&O find buttons boring—hence the imaginative controls on this knee-high, double-sided speaker. To change the volume, give it a gentle push like you’re trying to roll it. When the volume hits the desired level, let go and the cylinder settles back into place. It’s a design that upends expectations of how a speaker should look and function, and its wireless audio chops (options include AirPlay 2, Bluetooth, and Chromecast) are as progressive as its silhouette.

$3,500

Stephanie Gonot

4. Audeze Mobius

These high-end Bluetooth headphones deliver powerful, distortion-free audio, but their real talent is transforming the listening experience. Built-in sensors powered by Waves Nx track the direction I’m facing, and the audio adjusts as I turn my head to keep the soundstage centered, simulating how we hear sound in the real world. Using the effect while gaming deepens my immersion in virtual worlds, and it puts me in the audience of my favorite live jazz recordings.

$399

STYLING GRACE SUH

When you buy something using the retail links in our stories, we may earn a small affiliate commission. Read more about how this works.

This article appears in the June issue. Subscribe now.

Get more tech news with our Gadget Lab podcast, available on iTunes and Spotify.


More Great WIRED Stories

Read More

Hexbyte  News  Computers CSS Grid Level 2 – subgrid is coming to Firefox – Mozilla Hacks – the Web developer blog

Hexbyte News Computers CSS Grid Level 2 – subgrid is coming to Firefox – Mozilla Hacks – the Web developer blog

Hexbyte News Computers

The subgrid feature which is part of Level 2 of the CSS Grid Specification is not yet shipping in any browser, but is now available for testing in Firefox Nightly. This is a feature that, if you have used CSS Grid for a layout of any complexity, you are likely to be pretty excited about. In this article I’m going to introduce the feature and some of the use cases it solves.

So what is subgrid exactly? In terms of syntax, it is a new keyword value for the grid-template-columns and grid-template-rows properties. These properties normally accept a track listing, a listing of sizes of the tracks you want in your grid. For example, the following CSS would create a three column track grid with a 200px column, a column sized as max-content, and a final 1fr column.

grid-template-columns: 200px max-content 1fr;

You can find out more about track sizing in general, and the basics of grid layout via the MDN Guide Basic concepts of Grid Layout.

If we define a track as a subgrid, however, we replace the track listing with the keyword subgrid.

grid-template-columns: subgrid;

This instructs the grid-template-columns property to use the tracks defined on the parent, as the track sizing and number used by this nested grid.

In the example below I have an element which is a grid container. It contains three child elements – two div elements and a ul.

A
B
  • List item 1
  • List item 2
  • List item 3

I create a grid on .wrapper, and the direct children lay out on the grid I have created, but the list items go back to displaying as list items.

.wrapper {
  display: grid;
  grid-template-columns: 2.5fr 1fr 0.5fr;
  gap: 20px;
}

.box1 {
  grid-column: 1;
  grid-row: 1;
}

.box2 {
  grid-column: 2 / 4;
  grid-row: 1;
}

.box3 {
  grid-column: 1 / -1;
  grid-row: 2;
}

Hexbyte  News  Computers A layout of boxes, with list items displayed one below the other

The list items do not participate in grid layout.

If we make the ul with a class of box3 a grid, and set grid-template-columns to subgrid, the ul is now a three column track grid. The list items laying out using the tracks of the parent.

.box3 {
  grid-column: 1 / -1;
  grid-row: 2;
  display: grid;
  grid-template-columns: subgrid;
}

Hexbyte  News  Computers A layout of boxes with aligned elements.

The list items use the grid of the parent of the list.

 

CodePen (needs Firefox Nightly)

There are some additional nice features which make subgrid useful for patterns you might need to build. The gap properties are inherited by default into subgrids – however you can override that with a gap, row-gap, or column-gap property on the subgrid itself.

The lines in your subgrid will inherit the line names set on the parent grid. This means that you can position items in the subgrid with the line names on your main grid. You can however add line names just for the subgrid and these will be added to any inherited names.

Take a look at the guide to subgrid on MDN to read about all of these features and see example code.

Hexbyte News Computers What will subgrid be useful for?

In terms of new syntax, and new things to learn, this is a very small change for web developers who have learned grid layout. A grid defined as a subgrid is pretty much the same as a regular nested grid with its own track listings. However it makes a number of previous difficult patterns possible.

For example, if you have a card layout, and the cards have headers and footers with uneven amounts of content, you might want the card headers and footers to align across the rows. However, with a standard nested grid this isn’t possible. The grid on each card is independent, therefore the track sizing in card A can’t respond to change of height inside card B.

Hexbyte  News  Computers A grid of cards with headers and footers which do not align

The card internal elements do not line up

If we cause each card to span across three rows however, we can then change the value of grid-template-rows to subgrid.

.card {
  grid-row: auto / span 3;
  display: grid;
  grid-template-rows: subgrid;
}

The card still spans three row tracks, but those rows are defined on the parent and therefore each footer is in the same row. If one footer gets taller, it makes the whole row taller.

CodePen example.

Hexbyte  News  Computers A grid of cards with aligned headers and footers.

The card internal elements now line up.

You might want to work to a standard 12-column layout. Without subgrid, components which are not direct children of the grid container can’t be laid out on that parent grid. Instead, you need to be careful with track sizing in the nested components in order to get the layout to work. With subgrid we can opt nested grids into that parent grid as far into the structure as is required.

This means that in the below wireframe example, all elements are using the tracks defined on the main element, even things that are nested inside two grids – such as the links inside a list inside a nav element. The screenshot below has the lines of that parent grid displayed using the Firefox Grid Inspector.

Hexbyte  News  Computers A layout with grid lines overlaid

The twelve column grid highlighted by the Grid Inspector

CodePen example.

A less obvious use case for subgrid is to help in the situation where you have an unknown amount of repeated content in your layout, and want to be able to place an item from the start to the end of the grid.

We can target the end of an explicit grid with -1, so an item which is placed with grid-row: 1 / -1 will stretch from the first to the last row line. The below grid has two row tracks defined. The block on the left stretches over both as it is spanning from column line 1 to column line -1.

Hexbyte  News  Computers A grid of boxes with the Firefox Grid Inspector showing the lines

The explicit grid highlighted with the Grid Inspector

CodePen example.

However, if you are creating implicit row tracks, because you don’t know how many items there will be you can’t target the end of the implicit grid with -1. As we do not have explicit tracks after the first track (a grid always has one explicit track in each dimension) the blue item can’t span to the end line after all of the auto-placed items have been laid out.

Hexbyte  News  Computers A arrangement of boxes, one blue box is top left.

Without an explicit grid the item cannot stretch to the end line

CodePen example.

If you make the repeating section a subgrid for columns, with implicit rows, all of those rows fit into the same grid area of the parent, rather than creating more rows on the parent. This means that you can have a fully explicit parent grid and know exactly where the end line is no matter how many items are added in the subgridded part.

The only compromise would be the addition of an extra wrapper if your markup didn’t have a container for these repeating elements. However a single wrapping div is not going to cause any problems and enables this pattern.

Hexbyte  News  Computers An arrangement of boxes with a full height box on the left

The sidebar stretches to the height of the content

CodePen example.

Hexbyte News Computers Firefox DevTools and subgrid

The DevTools team have been working on adding features to DevTools that will make it easier to work with multiple grids, including subgrid.

You can now highlight multiple grids with DevTools. This can be helpful to see how the grid lines up with each other. You can see this in action by highlighting multiple grids in the cards example above, letting you see how the lines of the rows on our cards align with the parent rows.

Hexbyte  News  Computers A grid of cards with two grids of lines displayed overlaid

Two grids are highlighted here, one on the parent and one on a child

In the Grid Inspector subgrids have a little subgrid badge, and appear nested inside their parent. These things should help you to identify them better when working with complex arrangements of grids.

Hexbyte  News  Computers The Firefox DevTools open to show the different ways that subgrids are highlighted.

DevTools makes it easy to see your subgrids.

The team are still working on features, including the ability to highlight a parent when a subgrid is selected.

Hexbyte News Computers Status of the subgrid feature

Subgrid is now available in Firefox Nightly, so you can test it out, and we would love for you to do so. Firefox will have the first implementation of the specification, so feedback from web developers is vital both for the Firefox implementation, the DevTools, and for the CSS specification itself.

Some more resources can be found in the MDN guide, also I have started to build some more examples at Grid by Example – my website of CSS Grid examples. In addition see an article I wrote about the specification, before we had any implementation – CSS Grid Level 2: Here Comes Subgrid.

Rachel Andrew is a front and back-end web developer, one half of the company behind Perch CMS, and Editor in Chief of Smashing Magazine. She is a Google Developer Expert for web technologies and a member of the CSS Working Group representing Fronteers, where she is co-editor of the Multi-column Layout spec. Author of 22 books, and a frequent public speaker at conferences worldwide, you can find out what she is up to at https://rachelandrew.co.uk.

More articles by Rachel Andrew…

Read More

Hexbyte – Tech News – Ars Technica | YouTube bans neo-Nazi and Holocaust-denial videos in push against hate speech

Hexbyte – Tech News – Ars Technica | YouTube bans neo-Nazi and Holocaust-denial videos in push against hate speech

Hexbyte – Tech News – Ars Technica |

YouTube bans —

White supremacists and others who promote discrimination will be banned.


Hexbyte - Tech News - Ars Technica | An illustration of YouTube's logo behind barbed wire.

YouTube today expanded its hate-speech policy to ban more white supremacist videos, such as those that promote Nazi ideology. The site is also banning hoax videos that deny the existence of the Holocaust and other well-documented violent events.

The move will likely result in bans for many white supremacist YouTubers and other people spreading hateful ideologies.

“Today, we’re taking another step in our hate-speech policy by specifically prohibiting videos alleging that a group is superior in order to justify discrimination, segregation, or exclusion based on qualities like age, gender, race, caste, religion, sexual orientation, or veteran status,” YouTube’s announcement said. “This would include, for example, videos that promote or glorify Nazi ideology, which is inherently discriminatory. Finally, we will remove content denying that well-documented violent events, like the Holocaust or the shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary, took place.”

YouTube, which is owned by Alphabet subsidiary Google and has been under pressure to ban more offensive content, said it will begin enforcing the updated policy today. “However, it will take time for our systems to fully ramp up, and we’ll be gradually expanding coverage over the next several months,” YouTube said.

Some of the videos targeted by YouTube’s new policy do have “value to researchers and NGOs looking to understand hate in order to combat it,” the company said. Because of that, YouTube said it is “exploring options” to make banned videos available to researchers and NGOs in the future.

“[A]s always, context matters, so some videos could remain up because they discuss topics like pending legislation, aim to condemn or expose hate, or provide analysis of current events,” YouTube said.

“YouTube did not name any specific channels or videos that would be banned,” The New York Times noted. “But on Wednesday, numerous far-right creators began complaining that their videos had been deleted or had been stripped of ads, presumably a result of the new policy.” Thousands of videos are expected to be removed.

YouTube said it will also try to reduce the spread of what it calls “borderline content.” In January, YouTube “piloted an update of our systems in the US to limit recommendations of borderline content and harmful misinformation, such as videos promoting a phony miracle cure for a serious illness or claiming the Earth is flat,” the company said. YouTube said today that it plans to deploy that system in more countries later this year.

YouTube last year started displaying Wikipedia links and other information alongside videos that spread conspiracy theories. The effort to recommend more accurate information will expand, too, YouTube said today.

“[I]f a user is watching a video that comes close to violating our policies, our systems may include more videos from authoritative sources (like top news channels) in the ‘watch next’ panel,” YouTube said.

Hexbyte – Tech News – Ars Technica | YouTube employees pushed execs to take action

A Bloomberg report in April said that

Read More

Hexbyte – Tech News – Ars Technica | Brad Pitt heads into space with mega daddy issues in first Ad Astra trailer

Hexbyte – Tech News – Ars Technica | Brad Pitt heads into space with mega daddy issues in first Ad Astra trailer

Hexbyte – Tech News – Ars Technica |

Space cadet —

Director James Gray wants it to have “the most realistic depiction of space travel.”


Brad Pitt stars as an astronaut in search of his long-lost father (Tommy Lee Jones) in Ad Astra.

An astronaut must venture to the edge of our solar system to save the planet in the first trailer for sci-fi drama Ad Astra.

Director James Gray (The Lost City of Z) has said he wanted to make a film that depicted space travel as realistically as possible “and to basically say, ‘Space is awfully hostile to us.’ It’s kind of a Heart of Darkness story about traveling to the outer edge of our solar system.” The official synopsis strikes just the right note of vague grandiosity: “Astronaut Roy McBride (Brad Pitt) travels to the outer edges of the solar system to find his missing father and unravel a mystery that threatens the survival of our planet. His journey will uncover secrets that challenge the nature of human existence and our place in the cosmos.”

  • Brad Pitt stars as astronaut Roy McBride.


    YouTube/20th Century Fox

  • Roy’s father Clifford disappeared years before and is presumed dead.


    YouTube/20th Century Fox

  • Crew excited to get to work.


    YouTube/20th Century Fox

  • Up in the stratosphere.


    YouTube/20th Century Fox

  • Free fallin’


    YouTube/20th Century Fox

  • Liv Tyler plays Roy’s long-suffering wife.


    YouTube/20th Century Fox

  • This is his serious face.


    YouTube/20th Century Fox

  • When your missing dad is Tommy Lee Jones.


    YouTube/20th Century Fox

  • Getting his swagger on.


    YouTube/20th Century Fox

  • No really, psychologically, he’s fine.


    YouTube/20th Century Fox

  • Buggy races on the moon?

Read More

Hexbyte – News – Science/Nature | An asteroid has a very tiny chance of hitting Earth this year – CNET

Hexbyte – News – Science/Nature | An asteroid has a very tiny chance of hitting Earth this year – CNET

Hexbyte – News – Science/Nature |

Hexbyte - News - Science/Nature | phaethon-asteroid-dust2-small

An artistic impression of a potentially hazardous asteroid.


Theodore R. Kareta

An asteroid up to double the width of the bolide that exploded in the atmosphere over Russia in 2013 is making a close approach of our planet this September, and there’s a teeny tiny chance it could make an even bigger impact. 

But it almost certainly won’t. Asteroid 2006 QV89 currently has a one in 7,000 chance of hitting Earth on the morning of Sept. 9, according to the European Space Agency, which lists the space rock as the fourth most concerning object on its top 10 list of cosmic items with a non-zero chance of hitting us

Current modeling of the asteroid’s orbit shows it more likely passing by Earth at a distance of over 4.2 million miles (6.8 million km) this September, but ESA says there’s a roughly one hundredth of 1% chance the model is way off and it hits our planet instead. 

At a diameter of up to 164 feet (50 meters), it could be the sort of meteoroid impact we only see every few decades, and the NASA administrator recently noted that we’re due for a few more of the sort this century.

To better estimate the odds that 2006 QV89 could give us trouble, ESA has been remeasuring images of it from over a decade ago, but the new assessment has yet to change the chance of impact much. 

Then again, recent history has shown us that sometimes the most dangerous asteroids are the ones we haven’t yet spotted. For example, the bolide that blew out thousands of windows in Russia six years ago came from behind the shadow of the sun and wasn’t seen by astronomers until it was already colliding with our atmosphere. 

Read More