Hexbyte – Science and Tech Mexican Newspaper Prints Graphic Of The New Pokémon Games: Sword, Shield, And Gun – Kotaku

Hexbyte – Science and Tech Mexican Newspaper Prints Graphic Of The New Pokémon Games: Sword, Shield, And Gun – Kotaku

Hexbyte – Science and Tech

Hexbyte - Science and Tech

One of the funniest reactions to last week’s reveal of Pokémon Sword and Shield for the Nintendo Switch was Twitter user @Sir5000’s joking addition of Pokémon Gun to the lineup. The mock logo is so convincing, Mexican newspaper La Voz de Michoacán ran with it.

On February 27 the La Voz de Michoacán website ran a story about the announcement of Pokémon Sword and Shield. The story made no mention of Gun, the joke game that does not exist, but did include a retweeted version of @Sir5000’s image.

It was an odd choice of Tweets to include. Then the print version of the paper, published on March 2, made an even odder choice. The story, written by Mario Plancarte, contained no mention of Pokémon Gun. The accompanying art, however, included all three logos, each corresponding to one of the game’s starters. The glorious Scorbunny and weeping Sobble are Shield and Sword respectively, while grass monkey Grookey looks like he’s reaching for a pistol.

Twitter user Cin Ceja brought the article to light on March 3 with the message, “My local newspaper, always doing research before publishing anything.”

According to print article author Plancarte, he was only responsible for the written portion of the page. The department responsible for formatting the article looks to have combined official Nintendo art of the starters with the two real and one fake logos. It looks like the paper even scrubbed @Sir5000’s watermark from the Gun logo. La Voz de Michoacán issued an apology for the silly image earlier today.

We’re just disappointed that the newspaper wasn’t reporting a huge scoop. We’d really like Nintendo to make a game called Pokémon Gun.

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Hexbyte – Science and Tech Juggling passwords is a chore, and soon you might not have to – PC Gamer

Hexbyte – Science and Tech Juggling passwords is a chore, and soon you might not have to – PC Gamer

Hexbyte – Science and Tech

Hexbyte - Science and Tech

Password managers like LastPass exist because (A) you should be using strong, difficult to guess and unique passwords for every important account, and (B) remembering several or even dozens of passwords is no easy task. Fortunately, the web is moving towards an easier and more secure way of doing things thanks to WebAuthn.

WebAuthn, which is short for Web Authentication, is an API that allows for secure, password-less logins. It’s not a new standard, but up until now, it was not an official one. The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) changed that today by declaring WebAuthn as an official web standard, thus paving the road for more widespread adoption.

“Now is the time for web services and businesses to adopt WebAuthn to move beyond vulnerable passwords and help web users improve the security of their online experiences,” said Jeff Jaffe, W3C CEO. “W3C’s recommendation establishes web-wide interoperability guidance, setting consistent expectations for web users and the sites they visit. W3C is working to implement this best practice on its own site.”

The WebAuthn API allows users to log into websites using biometric security measures, such as fingerprint scanning or facial recognition. It can also be used with FIDO security keys that plug into USB ports, and mobile devices such as smartphones to verify a user’s identity.

Having a standard is one thing, but actually utilizing it is another. One thing that works in the API’s favor is that it is already supported in Windows 10 and Android, and by every major web browser. That includes Chrome, Firefox, Edge (which is being rebuilt around the same engine as Chrome), and Safari.

That said, support is not automatic—websites have to specifically code support for the API. It’s W3C’s hope that this will take place sooner than later.

“Web services and apps can—and should—turn on this functionality to give their users the option to log in more easily via biometrics, mobile devices and/or FIDO security keys, and with much higher security over passwords alone,” W3C says.

For now, you’ll still have to remember your passwords, or offload the task to a password manager. Perhaps not for long, though.