Hexbyte  Tech News  Wired Space Photos of the Week: Mooooooon Shadow, Moon Shadow

Hexbyte Tech News Wired Space Photos of the Week: Mooooooon Shadow, Moon Shadow

Hexbyte Tech News Wired

You may have heard that NASA has plans to go back to the moon in the 2020s, but the agency is not aiming to land just anywhere. Engineers want to study the dark side of the moon, seeking out deposits of water ice there.

Turns out there are regions and many craters on the moon that are always in shadow, and therefore rather frosty. But what good is a bunch of lunar ice? Well, hydrogen and oxygen are useful. If we can get robots and humans back up to the moon, they might be able to dig up that ice and convert it into fuel to power rockets. The oxygen from the water can also be used for life support for the crew.

From our new lunar station, we head to NASA’s next dream destination—Mars. Then we’ll check out a comet that made its (relatively) close approach to Earth, where a NASA telescope caught it red-handed.

We also visit a dying star that’s left a mess of debris everywhere around it, but don’t let that get you down, for we’re closing out with one of the largest globular clusters ever found, Messier 3. This behemoth holds some half a million sparklers dating back 8 billion years.

When you’re weary, feeling small, your time will come to shine. All of WIRED’s space photos are on their way, here.


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Hexbyte  Tech News  Wired Trump’s “Shadow Banning” Tweet Isn’t Twitter’s Biggest Problem

Hexbyte Tech News Wired Trump’s “Shadow Banning” Tweet Isn’t Twitter’s Biggest Problem

Hexbyte Tech News Wired

There’s a not-so-subtle irony to the president of the United States tweeting that Twitter is suppressing prominent conservative voices in America—and almost instantly receiving tens of thousands of likes, retweets, and replies. But such are the times.

On Thursday, in the early morning hours typically reserved for tweets bashing China and the mainstream media, President Trump accused Twitter, arguably the most important platform in enabling his rise to power, of “shadow banning” conservatives. The tweet followed a Vice News story, which reported that Twitter is suppressing Republicans, including some members of Congress, by failing to surface their names in certain search results on the site, a practice Vice referred to as “shadow banning.” The president swiftly promised to “look into this discriminatory and illegal practice at once.” (It’s worth noting that content moderation on tech platforms isn’t illegal.)

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