Hexbyte  Tech News  Wired Elon Musk Is Broken, and We Have Broken Him

Hexbyte Tech News Wired Elon Musk Is Broken, and We Have Broken Him

Hexbyte Tech News Wired

Hexbyte  Tech News  Wired

Elon Musk is Hercules remixed: not assigned his great labors as penance for his murdering his children in a fit of insanity, but driven mad by the effort of completing his labors—and now threatening to kill what he has created.

Bobby Yip/reuters

Hexbyte  Tech News  Wired

Elon Musk is Hercules remixed: not assigned his great labors as penance for his murdering his children in a fit of insanity, but driven mad by the effort of completing his labors—and now threatening to kill what he has created.

Bobby Yip/reuters

Of all the striking things about the interview with Elon Musk The New York Times published Thursday night—the tears, the lack of regrets over certain tweets, the fact that rapper Azealia Banks may somehow be part of Tesla’s financial future—was Musk’s claim that he’d be ready to abandon his role as Tesla CEO and chairman.

“If you have anyone who can do a better job, please let me know. They can have the job,” he told the paper. “Is there someone who can do the job better? They can have the reins right now.”

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Hexbyte  Tech News  Wired Health Care Is Broken. Google Thinks Oscar Health Can Fix It

Hexbyte Tech News Wired Health Care Is Broken. Google Thinks Oscar Health Can Fix It

Hexbyte Tech News Wired

Hexbyte  Tech News  Wired

Mario Schlosser, the CEO of Oscar Health, wants technology to cure what ails the health care industry. And now Alphabet, Google’s parent company, is betting $375 million on this digital panacea.

Eduardo Munoz/Reuters

Hexbyte  Tech News  Wired

Mario Schlosser, the CEO of Oscar Health, wants technology to cure what ails the health care industry. And now Alphabet, Google’s parent company, is betting $375 million on this digital panacea.

Eduardo Munoz/Reuters

In the late 1990s, two graduate students in Stanford’s computer science department set out to organize the world’s information. Shortly thereafter, a visiting scholar named Mario Schlosser arrived on campus, set on figuring out how trust could be built into peer-to-peer networks. The original server used by the graduate students, who were now running a little outfit named Google, had formerly been crammed under a desk in the office Schlosser now used.

Now, 20 years later, the graduate students have done OK, and they no longer need to borrow server space. But they’ve continually been stifled by one kind of information that’s very hard to organize: health care data. The industry in America is a mess: yoked together with confusing regulations, perverse incentives, and computers running Windows XP. Meanwhile, Schlosser has moved on from academia and created a company, called Oscar, with Joshua Kushner (brother of Jared) to try to solve those problems. The goal of Oscar is to do to health care what Uber did to the taxi industry: use smart digital technology to make everything faster and easier for customers, and then use the data gathered to build radically new services, which can collect more data that leads to new services. (Ideally, Oscar would like to accomplish this without cracking as many eggs on its own head as Uber did.)

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