Hexbyte Tech News Wired When it Comes to Autonomous Cars, the Department of Transportation Says ‘Drivers’ Don’t Have to Be Human

Hexbyte Tech News Wired

Hexbyte  Tech News  Wired

The companies building automated trucks would one day like to use robot vehicles to transport the 50 million tons of freight shipped on American highways each day.

Waymo

Hexbyte  Tech News  Wired

The companies building automated trucks would one day like to use robot vehicles to transport the 50 million tons of freight shipped on American highways each day.

Waymo

The Department of Transportation is getting a little more creative about how it defines “driver,” Secretary Elaine Chao announced Thursday. In the third version of the department’s official stance on self-driving, the department said it would “adapt the definitions of ‘driver’ and ‘operator’ to recognize that such terms to not refer exclusively to a human, but may in fact include an automated system.” The computers have a ticket to drive now—at least where federal regulations are concerned.

And while this is good news for everyone working on building, and eventually deploying, self-driving vehicles, it’s especially welcome for the automated trucking crowd. Waymo, Daimler, Volvo, Embark Trucks, Kache.ai, Starsky and Kodiak Robotics, TuSimple, Ike: Automated trucking companies have boomed this year, even after Uber got out of the trucking race. And all these VC-funded people would one day like to use their robot vehicles to transport the 50 million tons of freight shipped on American highways each day.

Read More