Hexbyte Tech News Wired Spike Lee Is at His Searing Best With ‘BlacKkKlansman’

Hexbyte Tech News Wired

Hexbyte  Tech News  Wired

Lee’s tale of a black detective infiltrating the Ku Klux Klan is his best film in years, investigating how identity is weaponized for and against us.

David Lee/Focus Features

Hexbyte  Tech News  Wired

Lee’s tale of a black detective infiltrating the Ku Klux Klan is his best film in years, investigating how identity is weaponized for and against us.

David Lee/Focus Features

Spike Lee’s white-hot genre mash-up BlacKkKlansman initiates its course in the early 1970s. It’s a time “marked by the spread of integration and miscegenation,” according to an unnamed race theorist in the opening sequence (he’s played with palpable animosity by Alec Baldwin). In Colorado Springs, he continues, a sect of “true, white Americans” sense a movement brewing among black “radicals” and Jews who they feel have “pressured their great way of life.” The proto-MAGA sentiment is but a backdrop, one of many ways Lee’s latest joint teases out the resonances between then and now. The parallels aren’t simply the work of a fabulist, though; the playfully urgent film is inspired by real events—as Lee styles it, “some fo’ real, fo’ real shit”.

Elsewhere in Colorado Springs, Ron Stallworth (John David Washington) is at a crossroads. The first black officer on the Colorado Springs Police Force, he’s overcome the department’s internal racism to attain the rank of a detective, but an assignment has left him with mixed allegiances, torn between his work and the world. It’s not until he comes across an ad in the paper from the Ku Klux Klan that it all clicks—call them, and pretend to be white.

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