Hexbyte – Tech News – Ars Technica | A Soyuz crew makes an emergency landing after rocket fails

Hexbyte – Tech News – Ars Technica |

Not good —

It is not clear how long the Soyuz vehicle will be grounded.


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A Soyuz rocket launches with Expedition 57 Flight Engineer Nick Hague of NASA and Flight Engineer Alexey Ovchinin of Roscosmos, Thursday, October 11, 2018.

NASA

On Thursday in Kazakhstan, at 4:40am EDT, a Soyuz rocket took off carrying NASA astronaut Nick Hague and Russian cosmonaut Aleksey Ovchinin toward the International Space Station. The ascent proceeded normally until the separation of one of the rocket’s booster stages, by which point the crew had already experienced microgravity.

Because the Soyuz spacecraft did not reach orbit at the point of this booster failure, the crew was forced to make a rapid ballistic descent likely under high g-forces. After about 20 minutes of uncertainty, Russian officials confirmed the crew were ok and had landed about 20km east of Dzhezkazgan, a city in central Kazakhstan. As rescue crews arrived, Hague and Ovchinin were reported in “good condition” and found out of the capsule.

Little additional information has been provided. Roscosmos, the Russian firm that operates the nation’s space agency and is responsible for Soyuz launches, will not hold any news conferences today. The head of Roscosmos, Dmitry Rogozin, said a state commission has already been established to study the accident.

This failure raises serious questions about the future of the International Space Station, as, since the space shuttle’s retirement in 2011, the Soyuz spacecraft and rocket were the only means by which crews have been able to reach it. With Thursday’s failed launch, just three people remain on the station: American astronaut Serena Auñón-Chancellor, German ISS Commander Alexander Gerst, and Russian Sergey Prokopyev.

It is not clear how long the Soyuz vehicle will be grounded or how long the current crew can remain in orbit. NASA’s own transportation s

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