Hexbyte  Tech News  Wired ACLU Says Facebook Ads Let Employers Favor Men Over Women

Hexbyte Tech News Wired ACLU Says Facebook Ads Let Employers Favor Men Over Women

Hexbyte Tech News Wired

Hexbyte  Tech News  Wired

Getty Images/Lauren Joseph

In recent years, Facebook has faced lawsuits, media exposés, and even federal charges alleging that its ad-targeting tools help advertisers discriminate based on age or race for jobs, housing, and credit. Now, the American Civil Liberties Union claims Facebook is also allowing employers to discriminate against women.

On Tuesday, the ACLU filed a charge with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, alleging that Facebook violated labor and civil rights laws by allowing employers to target ads to (mostly younger) men, to the exclusion of (mostly older) women and gender-nonbinary job-seekers.

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Hexbyte  Tech News  Wired How Audi’s Electric E-tron SUV Stacks Up to Its Competitors

Hexbyte Tech News Wired How Audi’s Electric E-tron SUV Stacks Up to Its Competitors

Hexbyte Tech News Wired

Hexbyte  Tech News  Wired

Starting at $74,500, Audi’s E-tron SUV is just the latest entry in the increasingly competitive electric SUV segment.

Eric Adams

Hexbyte  Tech News  Wired

Starting at $74,500, Audi’s E-tron SUV is just the latest entry in the increasingly competitive electric SUV segment.

Eric Adams

Synchronized flashing wristbands. Opulent hors d’oeuvres. Journalists carted across the San Francisco Bay on a fancy boat ride. For Audi, the global unveil of its first fully electric production car, the E-tron SUV, merited a rather groß feier. And the vehicle itself looks quite nice: a 95-kWh battery, good for over 200 miles, and a price tag starting at $74,800.

If you’re in the market for a high-end electric vehicle, the E-tron just made your choice harder. Mercedes, Porsche, and BMW want to make it tougher still, as they all seek to claim their share of a market that Tesla created and has long dominated.

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Hexbyte  Tech News  Wired Still Smarting From Uber, Cities Wise up About Scooter Data

Hexbyte Tech News Wired Still Smarting From Uber, Cities Wise up About Scooter Data

Hexbyte Tech News Wired

Hexbyte  Tech News  Wired

Cities need better data to police their streets, and they’re no longer afraid to demand it.

Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images

Hexbyte  Tech News  Wired

Cities need better data to police their streets, and they’re no longer afraid to demand it.

Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images

From the airy Soma offices of the startup Remix, it all feels very calm. Usually, things move sort of slowly here, employees say. Remix creates planning software for cities, which means its workers spend their time going back and forth with the 300 government agencies—cough, bureaucracies—that they call clients. Recently, though, the work has picked up speed.

Over the past eight months, cities have started asking for a new kind of software: digital tools to deal with the dockless electric bikes and scooters that have suddenly swarmed their sidewalks. From Los Angeles, San Francisco, Chattanooga, Philadelphia, and Boston have come the tales: of monied startups dropping their new, zippy devices onto public land—and into loud public debate.

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Hexbyte  Tech News  Wired Gillette’s Heated Razor Warms Your Face While You Shave

Hexbyte Tech News Wired Gillette’s Heated Razor Warms Your Face While You Shave

Hexbyte Tech News Wired

For years, innovation in men’s razors seemed to center on adding more blades. More recently, with the advent of upstarts like Dollar Shave Club and Harry’s, the focus has shifted to affordability. Gillette’s latest product rejects both of these trends. The Heated Razor adds not a blade, but a “warming bar” that keeps its cartridge toasty throughout your shave. And at $150, it’s unabashedly priced for a premium crowd.

“In the end, the search for warmth, the heat, has always been a constant,” says Donato Diez Guerrero, global brand manager for Gillette. “What we’re trying to do with the Heated Razor is providing them that consistent, sustained warmth that gets distributed over the face in an even way.”

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Hexbyte  Tech News  Wired WIRED 25th Anniversary: Who’s Shaping Tech’s Next 25 Years?

Hexbyte Tech News Wired WIRED 25th Anniversary: Who’s Shaping Tech’s Next 25 Years?

Hexbyte Tech News Wired

Hexbyte  Tech News  Wired

For 25 years, technology has turned the world upside down and inside out. Now the icons of the digital revolution tell us who will shake up the next 25.

“Why WIRED? Because the Digital Revolution is whipping through our lives like a Bengali typhoon—while the mainstream media is still groping for the snooze button.”

So began the founding manifesto of this magazine. It’s an awesome document: 216 words of vim, bold font, and attitude. And thanks to the accidental SEO-juju of a factual error (typhoons in Bengal are actually called cyclones), its most famous phrase would forever refer Google searchers to the manifesto. In any event, it made you want to read the darn thing.

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Hexbyte  Tech News  Wired Apple Masters the Art of Incrementalism with the iPhone XS

Hexbyte Tech News Wired Apple Masters the Art of Incrementalism with the iPhone XS

Hexbyte Tech News Wired

Smartphones, for many of us, are emotional objects. We pick them up dozens of times per day. We use them both to deeply connect and mindlessly scroll. We feel frantic when we think we’ve misplaced them. Apple’s iPhones, in particular, trigger a personal connection to an inanimate object. They’re well-designed, satisfying, and covetable.

This year’s new iPhones? They’re last year’s phone design with some new internals. One of those new features is an impressive new chip, one of the first of its kind in a smartphone. This chip powers faster FaceID unlocks, better photos, and advanced AI. For the $1,000 you’ll spend on this phone, you’re earning back seconds of your time, getting photos you can adjust after you shoot them, and experiencing sophisticated computer vision in mobile apps.

But aside from one of the phones having a giant display, the iPhone XS and the larger iPhone XS Max don’t feel much different from last year’s iPhone X. This year’s phones don’t spark strong feelings—except maybe chagrin that they cost so much.

Some people will upgrade because they’re due for an upgrade. Others will buy one of these because they want to have the newest thing. And that’s fine. They’re great phones. Just don’t expect to feel the kind of feelings, as you’re sliding this phone out of your pocket or purse, that you’d get with a radically redesigned piece of hardware. As I used these new phones, I found myself struggling to define, exactly, what felt new about them. It’s there; you just have to dig deep.

Double Standard

If you’ve seen an iPhone X, then you already know what the iPhone XS looks like. And really, you already know what the iPhone XS Max looks like: it’s a jumbo iPhone X. Aside from the size and battery difference, the XS and the XS Max are exactly alike. I had originally planned to write two reviews, one of each phone, but then decided there was no need for that. Even their cameras are the same.

The phones are made of stainless steel, and coated in what Apple says is the strongest glass ever used in its phones. Just like last year’s phone, the XS has a 5.8-inch diagonal display with a 19.5 by 9 aspect ratio, which means it packs a lot of screen into a relatively small body. The iPhone XS Max is roughly the same size as last year’s iPhone 8 Plus, but has a much larger display—6.5 inches on the diagonal, compared to the 8 Plus’s 5.5 inches.

Unlocking the phone with FaceID seems slightly faster. App switching feels faster. And then there are the photos.

Overall, the OLED displays on these phones are beautiful, though largely unchanged from last year’s X. Apple claims the displays on the iPhone XS and iPhone XS Max will deliver 60 percent greater dynamic range on HDR content, and that the screens are more touch sensitive. Personally, I haven’t noticed much of a difference there. Another difference from last year’s iPhone X: the glass on the new phones is supposed to be more durable. However, I’m already seeing a hairline scratch on the face of the iPhone XS, something that the iPhone X was prone to, as well.

The iPhone XS and XS Max still have a Lightning port—same as the old phones. But the speakers have been tweaked to give wider stereo sound. They sound great, and louder than previous iPhones.

If you’ve already decided that you’re getting one of these new phones, but don’t know which one to pick, it really comes down to battery life and bigness. The iPhone XS Max has a larger battery than the iPhone XS, given its larger physical size. It’s supposed to last an hour and a half longer than an ol’ iPhone X. The iPhone XS, meanwhile, only lasts a half hour longer. I found the difference between the iPhone X and XS’s battery life to be negligible; but the iPhone XS Max’s battery never gave me the kind of anxiety I get at the end of the day with a smaller phone.

For some, the iPhone XS Max’s big display—the biggest ever on an iPhone—will be worth the occasional fumbles and the times you just need two hands just to hold the thing. Personally, I still think the size of the iPhone XS is the way to go. And while I don’t really notice the “notch” at the top of the iPhone XS (the cut-out that houses the front-facing camera and 3D sensors), I find this same cut-out jarring when I’m using split-screen mode on the iPhone XS Max.

Dollars and Sense

Before I go on, we should talk about cost. Like last year’s iPhone X, the iPhone XS starts at $999 for a 64-gigabyte model. The price jumps up to $1,349 for a version with 512GB of internal storage. The iPhone XS Max starts at $1,099, and goes up to $1,449 for the 512GB configuration.

These are the first iPhones to have 512 gigabytes of internal storage, something Samsung already offers in its flagship phones. Early benchmark tests also suggest that both phones have 4GB of RAM, one gigabyte more than last year’s iPhone X. (Apple hasn’t confirmed this.) We’ve come a long way from the days of 8GB of storage and 1GB of RAM.

Beth Holzer

A lot of people will make the argument that these powerful mini-computers are worth the inflated cost, especially since it’s something you use all day every day. I think those arguments are valid. But a thousand dollars for a phone is also a huge expense for the majority of the population. You could hardly be blamed for choosing more affordable options like an older iPhone or a mid-range Android handset, even with the knowledge that you’re not getting the best-of-the-best internals.

And if you weren’t already annoyed by the price, this might send you over the edge: Neither the iPhone XS nor the XS Max ship with a lighting-to-3.5mm adapter in the box. You might recall that iPhones don’t have headphone jacks anymore. So, if you still used wired headphones, you’ll have to buy your own dongle for them. And the phones still ship with USB-A cables, even though modern MacBooks use USB-C. These are small things, but it’s hard to imagine the Apple of even just five years ago forcing such tradeoffs onto its customers.

Spicy Silicon

By far the most important update in the iPhone XS and XS Max is Apple’s new mobile chip. Last year’s A11 Bionic chip was a 10-nanometer chip with a six-core CPU, a three-core GPU, and a neural engine designed for machine learning tasks that could perform up to 600 billion operations per second. This year’s A12 Bionic is a 7-nanometer chip with a six-core CPU, a four-core GPU, and an even faster neural engine. It not only has more cores, but it can process up to 5 trillion operations per second.

In short, the new chip is the thing that’s supposed to make your phone feel faster, your photos look better, and your AR and AI apps more useful.

The chip giant Qualcomm, which makes the Snapdragon chips that power high-end Android phones, plans to ship a 7-nanometer processor soon. But with the launch of the new iPhones, Apple has just beat it to the punch.

Previously, the neural engine could only be accessed by Apple, which used it to power apps like Animoji and FaceID. Now third-party app developers can tap into it. We saw glimpses of this at last week’s Apple event, when the multiplayer game Galaga AR was demoed on stage alongside HomeCourt, a seriously cool basketball analysis app. HomeCourt can already recognize the lines of a basketball court and, using computer vision, track the shots you take and the ones you make. But right now it doesn’t do that in real-time. In the future, using the new A12 Bionic chip and Apple’s machine learning framework, it’s supposed to be able to do that.

The app wasn’t available to beta test during my review period, but we can expect more apps like it to roll out very soon. In the meantime, though, the processing power of the new A12 manifests itself in other ways. Unlocking the phone with FaceID seems slightly faster. App switching feels faster. And then there are the photos.

Let’s say you’re not into real-time basketball analysis or cool augmented reality apps or mobile games. You probably still care a lot about your smartphone’s camera. And this new processor, along with a larger camera sensor, mean both the iPhone XS and XS Max have a better camera than the one in last year’s high-end phone.

At a glance, the cameras in the iPhone XS and XS Max cameras appear to be the same as the ones in the iPhone X. Two 12-megapixel rear cameras. One 7-megapixel front-facing “TrueDepth” camera. 4K video at 60 frames per second. 1080p slow motion video at 240 fps. All the same.

Apple says what’s new is that this larger camera sensor equates to larger pixels. The camera is supposed to do a better job of adjusting its exposure to capture more information in each image. Last year’s iPhones already automatically captured high dynamic range images. This year it does it again, but better, grabbing more highlight data, and on more of your photos.

I captured a series of images on the new iPhones, last year’s iPhone X, last year’s iPhone 8 Plus, Google’s Pixel 2 XL, and Samsung’s Galaxy Note 9, and compared them all. (iPhone 8 Plus photos weren’t included in all of galleries here, due to a lack of consistency in which phones I used to shoot certain scenes.) Each smartphone camera has its own distinct personality: Samsung’s photos tend to be warm, saturated, and softened, while Google’s Pixel tends to capture crisp images, with cool, almost muted colors.

The photos I captured on the new iPhone XS and XS Max are undoubtedly better than the ones I took on the iPhone 8 Plus, and slightly improved from the iPhone X photos. The new phones performed well in low light, capturing even background imagery in more detail. In some ways the photos from the new iPhone remind me of Samsung’s photos now. Faces look smoother in both selfies and portraits, and the colors look richer in pictures of food, skylines, and natural landscapes.

The new iPhones also let you adjust the depth of a Portrait photo after the photo has been captured. This isn’t a new idea—Samsung has offered this in its flagship phones since it launched the Galaxy Note 8 last year. In Samsung cameras, it works by capturing one wide-angle and one telephoto image from the dual-lens camera and merging them together, using one image for the focal point and one for the blur effect. Sometimes the background blur looks too dramatic, and imprecise. Other times it works fine.

Apple’s method sounds similar, but works differently. The iPhone uses images from the two cameras—the wide-angle lens and the telephoto lens—to create a depth map. Then, the bokeh effect is simulated digitally. As you flick the slider through the aperture stops, background objects are blurred proportionally to how close they are to the main subject.

Overall, Portrait photos taken on the new iPhones looked a lot better than older iPhone Portrait photos—with or without the depth effect. In nighttime photos I took of my colleague Pia, the new iPhone depth-adjusted photos were better able to capture the car lights and city signs flashing behind her, and generally looked better than Samsung’s blurred photos. Still, it’s not comparable to the bokeh effect you’d get on a DSLR with a fast lens.

Future Calling

There are obvious differences between last year’s iPhones and this year’s iPhones, like the new processor and the giant display on the Max. But there are subtle differences too. It’s that subtlety that makes it hard to conjure up strong feelings around the new phones. It is an “S” year for iPhones, after all.

But in this case, it’s impressive incrementalism: There’s a noticeably faster chip, and a camera that captures a greater level of detail that you can actually see. Apple has nudged innovation in smartphones forward again, even if some of the results (like new apps that will use the new tech) have yet to be experienced.

I still think you shouldn’t feel like you have to upgrade if you invested in last year’s phones—or even if you have a slightly older phone, like an iPhone 7. Is there a palpable difference between these models and your one- or two-year old phone? Yes, absolutely. But that doesn’t mean your older phone is bad. That’s the thing about high-end smartphones, these mini-computers in our pockets: even last year’s models are still pretty darn amazing.

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Hexbyte  Tech News  Wired Beyond the Digital Revolution: The Need for Militant Optimism

Hexbyte Tech News Wired Beyond the Digital Revolution: The Need for Militant Optimism

Hexbyte Tech News Wired

When we launched WIRED, we were accused of being Pangloss­ian optimists. I embraced that as a badge of honor. The Digital Revolution was reinventing everything, and that was good. Twenty-five years on, that optimism is no longer justified—it’s necessary. Indeed: militant optimism.

WIRED’s premise was that the most powerful people on the planet weren’t the politicians or generals, priests or pundits, but the people creating and using new technology. The state and politics were obsolete. We no longer needed to subcontract our responsibility for society to distant capitals. By using the new tools now radically empowering individuals, we could, ourselves, work directly on making a better world.

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Hexbyte  Hacker News  Computers Germany launches world’s first hydrogen-powered train

Hexbyte Hacker News Computers Germany launches world’s first hydrogen-powered train

Hexbyte Hacker News Computers

Germany has rolled out the world’s first hydrogen-powered train, signalling the start of a push to challenge the might of polluting diesel trains with costlier but more eco-friendly technology.

Two bright blue Coradia iLint trains, built by French TGV-maker Alstom, on Monday began running a 62 mile (100km) route between the towns and cities of Cuxhaven, Bremerhaven, Bremervoerde and Buxtehude in northern Germany – a stretch normally plied by diesel trains.

“The world’s first hydrogen train is entering into commercial service and is ready for serial production,” Alstom CEO Henri Poupart-Lafarge said at an unveiling ceremony in Bremervoerde, the station where the trains will be refuelled with hydrogen.

Alstom has said it plans to deliver another 14 of the zero-emissions trains to Lower Saxony state by 2021, while other German states have also expressed an interest.

Hydrogen trains are equipped with fuel cells that produce electricity through a combination of hydrogen and oxygen, a process that leaves steam and water as the only emissions. Excess energy is stored in ion lithium batteries on board the train.

The Coradia iLint trains can run for about 600 miles (1,000km) on a single tank of hydrogen, similar to the range of diesel trains.

Alstom is betting on the technology as a greener, quieter alternative to diesel on non-electrified railway lines – an attractive prospect to many German cities scrambling to combat air pollution.

“Sure, buying a hydrogen train is somewhat more expensive than a diesel train, but it is cheaper to run,” Stefan Schrank, the project’s manager at Alstom, said.

Other countries are also looking into hydrogen trains, Alstom said, including Britain, the Netherlands, Denmark, Norway, Italy and Canada. In France, the government has already said it wants the first hydrogen train to be on the rails by 2022.

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Hexbyte  Hacker News  Computers David Patterson Says It’s Time for New Computer Architectures and Software Languages

Hexbyte Hacker News Computers David Patterson Says It’s Time for New Computer Architectures and Software Languages

Hexbyte Hacker News Computers

Hexbyte  Hacker News  Computers David Patterson
Photo: UC Berkeley
David Patterson

David Patterson, University of California professor, Google engineer, and RISC pioneer, says there’s no better time than now to be a computer architect.

That’s because Moore’s Law really is over, he says: “We are now a factor of 15 behind where we should be if Moore’s Law were still operative. We are in the post-Moore’s Law era.”

This means, Patterson told engineers attending the 2018 @Scale Conference held in San Jose last week, that “we’re at the end of the performance scaling that we are used to. When performance doubled every 18 months, people would throw out their desktop computers that were working fine because a friend’s new computer was so much faster.”

But last year, he said, “single program performance only grew 3 percent—so it’s doubling every 20 years. If you are just sitting there waiting for chips to get faster, you are going to have to wait a long time.”

For a computer architect like Patterson, this is actually good news. It’s also good news for innovative software engineers, he pointed out. “Revolutionary new hardware architectures and new software languages, tailored to dealing with specific kinds of computing problems, are just waiting to be developed,” he said. “There are Turing Awards waiting to be picked up if people would just work on these things.”

As an example on the software side, Patterson indicated that rewriting Python into C gets you a 50 times speedup in performance. Add in various optimization techniques, and the speedup increases dramatically. It wouldn’t be too much of a stretch, he indicated, “to make an improvement of a factor of 1,000 in Python.”

On the hardware front, Patterson thinks domain-specific architectures just run better—saying, “it’s not magic, there are just things we can do.” For example, applications don’t all require that computing be done to the same level of accuracy. For some, he said, you could use lower-precision floating point arithmetic than the commonly used IEEE 754 standard.

The biggest area of opportunity right now for applying such new architectures and languages is machine learning, Patterson said. “If you are a hardware person,” he said, “you want friends who desperately need more computers.” And machine learning is “ravenous for computing, which we just love.”

Today, he said, there’s a vigorous debate surrounding which type of computer architecture is best for machine learning, with many companies placing their bets. Google has its Tensor Processing Unit (TPU), with one core per chip and software-controlled memory instead of caches; Nvidia’s GPU has 80-plus cores; and Microsoft is taking an FPGA approach.

And Intel, he said “is trying to make all the bets,” marketing traditional CPUs for machine learning, purchasing Altera (the company that provides FPGAs to Microsoft), and buying Nervana with it specialized neural network processor (similar in approach to Google’s TPU).

Along with these major companies offering different architectures for machine learning, Patterson says there are at least 45 hardware startups tackling the problem. Ultimately, he said, the market will decide.

“This,” he says, “is a golden age for computer architecture.”

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Hexbyte  Hacker News  Computers EU to stop changing the clocks in 2019 | DW | 14.09.2018

Hexbyte Hacker News Computers EU to stop changing the clocks in 2019 | DW | 14.09.2018

Hexbyte Hacker News Computers

The EU is doing away with the twice-yearly clock changes and has given member states until April to decide if they will remain on summer or winter time. But there are fears Europe is heading for time-zone chaos.

European Commissioner for Transport Violeta Bulc on Friday announced that the EU will stop the twice-yearly changing of clocks across the continent in October 2019.

The practice, which was used as a means to conserve energy during the World Wars as well as the oil crises of the 1970s, became law across the bloc in 1996.

All EU countries are required to move forward by an hour on the last Sunday of March and back by an hour on the final Sunday in October.

Bulc said EU member states would have until April 2019 to decide whether they would permanently remain on summer or winter time. 

Read more: Summertime: What a joke!

What time is it in Brussels?

Bulc said she was counting on member states and the European Parliament to keep pace with the Commission’s “ambitious” schedule. She also noted the need to find consensus among the member states in order to avoid confusing time jumps.

The plan also raises the prospect of neighboring countries ending up an hour apart.

“In order to maintain a harmonised approach we are encouraging consultations at national levels to ensure a coordinated approach of all member states,” Bulc said.

The decision to tackle the issue was prompted after the Commission launched an online survey. Some 4.6 million Europeans answered the survey — three million of those respondents were from Germany — with 80 percent of them voting to scrap the practice.

Though critics say that is only a small percentage of the bloc’s population, the European Commission argues it is doing what voters expect of it: dealing with big issues.

Health problems and little savings

Those who oppose daylight savings say that it has become obsolete thanks to other more efficient energy-saving technologies such as LED lights. “We are clearly headed toward smart cities, smart buildings and smart solutions which will bring much more savings than changes of the clock,” said Commission Vice President Maros Sefcovic.

Critics have also cited long-term health problems, sleep-related issues and the reduced concentration that often accompanies the twice-yearly change. Proponents of daylight savings have long argued that it benefits public safety as well as saving energy.

Hexbyte  Hacker News  Computers Time zones in EU

Merkel is a fan

EU Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker is in favor of the move, telling German public broadcaster ZDF: “The people want it, so we will do it.” And German Chancellor Angela Merkel recently spoke on the topic during a trip to Nigeria, saying: “I personally think it’s a very high priority.”

  • Hexbyte  Hacker News  Computers Großbritannien London - Die schönsten Uhren Europas (picture-alliance/dpa/PA Wire/V. Jones)

    The most beautiful clocks in Europe

    Hexbyte Hacker News Computers Big Ben in London

    Europe’s most famous clock tower stands in London. Big Ben is only the nickname of the tower, because it is actually called Elizabeth Tower. Big Ben correctly refers to only the largest and heaviest of the five bells. The “Voice of Britain” tune played by the bells usually chimes every hour. The next few years, however, the bells remain silent, because the tower is being renovated.

  • Hexbyte  Hacker News  Computers Berlin - Die schönsten Uhren Europas (picture-alliance/Bildagentur-online/Schöning)

    The most beautiful clocks in Europe

    Hexbyte Hacker News Computers World Time Clock in Berlin

    The world time clock on Alexanderplatz is of a more recent model. It was designed in East German times by industrial designer Erich John and in 1969 presented to the public. Since then it has become a popular meeting place for Berliners and tourists. At the top is a simplified model of our solar system and the cylinder below shows the time in the 24 time zones of the earth.

  • Hexbyte  Hacker News  Computers Berlin Eingangsbereich des Europacenter - Die schönsten Uhren Europas (picture-alliance/Eibner-Pressefoto)

    The most beautiful clocks in Europe

    Hexbyte Hacker News Computers Clock of Flowing Time in Berlin

    A less well-known but all the more interesting clock is located in Berlin’s Europa-Center. The 13 meter (43 ft.) high chronometer from 1982 covers three floors. Here you can watch the flow of time. The level of green liquid in the large spheres on the left shows the hours, the small spheres on the right the minutes.

  • Hexbyte  Hacker News  Computers Prag - Die schönsten Uhren Europas (picture-alliance/chromorange/Bilderbox)

    The most beautiful clocks in Europe

    Hexbyte Hacker News Computers The clock at the Town Hall in Prague

    The Astronomical Clock at Prague Town Hall from 1410 is a masterpiece of Gothic technology. According to legend, after completion the eyes of the builder were plucked out so that the watch would remain unique in the world. And it is unique! At present, however, it is being renovated, visitors have to forego the play of figures representing the twelve apostles until the end of October 2018.

  • Hexbyte  Hacker News  Computers Schweiz Bern - Die schönsten Uhren Europas (picture-alliance/dpa/Sputnik/A. Filippov)

    The most beautiful clocks in Europe

    Hexbyte Hacker News Computers Zytglogge clock tower in Bern

    When it comes to clocks, Switzerland is a must. The Zytgogge, the clock tower from 1530, is the landmark of the capital Bern. On the hour tourists can always watch the game of figures depicting the golden hour beater, the cock and Chronos, the god of time.

  • Hexbyte  Hacker News  Computers Frankreich Elsass - Die schönsten Uhren Europas (picture-alliance/Arco Images GmbH/G. Lenz)

    The most beautiful clocks in Europe

    Hexbyte Hacker News Computers Astronomical Clock in Strasbourg

    This masterpiece of the Renaissance inside Strasbourg Cathedral was also built by Swiss clockmakers. The figures start moving every day at 12.30 pm. The apostles and the four ages, personified as children, juveniles, adults and the elderly. They all pass by death.

  • Hexbyte  Hacker News  Computers Triberg - Die schönsten Uhren Europas (Stadtverwaltung Triberg)

    The most beautiful clocks in Europe

    Hexbyte Hacker News Computers The world’s largest cuckoo clock in Triberg

    Cuckoo clocks alongside Bollenhut red bobble hat and cherry and chocolate gateau are the symbols of the Black Forest in southern Germany. So it is no wonder that the world’s largest cuckoo clock can be found here in Triberg. The movement alone weighs six tons! The cuckoo is impressive – to the full and half hour the 4.5 meter big wooden bird calls from its window on the first floor.

  • Hexbyte  Hacker News  Computers Deutschland Mariensäule und Glockenspiel am Rathaus in München (picture-alliance/dpa/A. Warmuth)

    The most beautiful clocks in Europe

    Hexbyte Hacker News Computers The Glockenspiel in Munich

    Two or three times a day, the glockenspiel figures make their big appearance at Munich City Hall. The life-size figures depict two events from Munich’s city history: the wedding of Duke Wilhelm V. in 1568 and the cooper’s dance depicting their defiance after a devastating plague epidemic. As historic as the glockenspiel is, it is operated with solar energy in a very modern way.

  • Hexbyte  Hacker News  Computers Österreich - Die schönsten Uhren Europas (picture-alliance /picturedesk/K. Schöndorfer)

    The most beautiful clocks in Europe

    Hexbyte Hacker News Computers The Anchor Clock in Vienna

    Vienna’s best-known clock adorns a small bridge between the two parts of the Anker-Hof building on the Hohe Markt square. The clock was designed by the Art Nouveau painter Franz Matsch. Within twelve hours twelve copper figures from Vienna’s history cross the bridge. At 12 noon accompanied by music all the figures parade, among them Empress Maria Theresia and composer Joseph von Haydn.

  • Hexbyte  Hacker News  Computers Österreich Graz - Die schönsten Uhren Europas (picture-alliance/dpa/Votava)

    The most beautiful clocks in Europe

    Hexbyte Hacker News Computers The Clock Tower in Graz

    In Austria, this clock is also famous, the Clock Tower of Graz, located on the Schlossberg, visible from afar. Its special feature is that the hour and minute hands are reversed. Originally there was only one large hand for the hours, so that it could be seen from a distance. Later, the small minute hand was added.

  • Hexbyte  Hacker News  Computers Venedig - Die schönsten Uhren Europas (picture-alliance/dpa/A. Engelhardt)

    The most beautiful clocks in Europe

    Hexbyte Hacker News Computers Torre dell’Orologio in Venice

    The Astronomical Clock on St Mark’s Square displays not just the time, but also the current zodiac sign as well as the phases of the moon and the sun. Until the last restoration in 1998, the “Temperatore”, the tower guard, lived in the tower with his family. Since 2006, the clock has been digitally monitored.

  • Hexbyte  Hacker News  Computers Frankreich - Die schönsten Uhren Europas (picture-alliance/MAXPPP/PHOTOPQR/Le Parisien/O. Boitet)

    The most beautiful clocks in Europe

    Hexbyte Hacker News Computers The House of Magic in Blois

    This is not a real clock, but the dragon heads in the French city of Blois still keep time. Every half hour they appear at the windows and move in a terrifying way. Behind the façade is a museum that provides a glimpse into the history of magic, because the father of modern magic, Robert-Houdin, was once born in Blois.

    Author: Elisabeth Yorck von Wartenburg


js/rt (dpa, Reuters) 

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